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Thread: Would this be a good sharpener for a Mora companion?

  1. #1
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    Would this be a good sharpener for a Mora companion?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/BearMoo-Sha...964M8N30NTHWVS

    Would this be a good sharpener for my Mora?

  2. #2
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    For fine sharpening and polishing, it would be fantastic. But for "regular use" sharpening, I would recommend a waterstone with a 600 or 800 grit side (like this one - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0186MC7NG?psc=1). It all depends on how frequently you want to hone the knife, and how much use the blade gets put through. I would also add in a Nagura stone to use on the higher grit side so that you can form an abrasive slurry...otherwise, that fine side is easy to clog and very slow to work.
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  3. #3
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    Am I right in that the higher the grit the sharper the blade can get?

  4. #4
    Woodsman Pootle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Law View Post
    Am I right in that the higher the grit the sharper the blade can get?
    Correct. As oak says, do you have a lower grit to use first? You'll need it unless you're edge is already pretty keen.

  5. #5
    Tribal Elder shepherd's Avatar
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    i agree with the other guys... I.M.O a cheap fine grit stone would go great with this...

  6. #6
    Natural Born Bushcrafter Woody's Avatar
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    Lower grits from 240 to 600 for removing "dings" and such and 800 to 1200 for getting that edge sharp.
    Anything higher is really to get a scary sharp edge on , which is great and the Japanese double sided (1000 /6000 or the one posted in above link) waterstones are more than enough for that.

    Just remember to flatten the stone back to "true" flat after each session with a lapping plate or diamond stone, and it will always get your (whole) blade sharp enough to shave ...
    👍😁
    Last edited by Woody; 03-01-2017 at 02:00 AM. Reason: Spelling

  7. #7
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    Aye, flatten the stone or else it will actually become slightly concave, or have an uneven surface. It's a lot harder to keep a Scandinavian grind unless the stone is flat. I've seen some well used waterstones that had a big dip in the middle, some 3.5 mm deep.
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
    ~ Cody Lundin

  8. #8
    Natural Born Bushcrafter Woody's Avatar
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    Like this ...


    https://youtu.be/ABRs2HkXkUE

    Hope it helps 👍

  9. #9
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    I've found that the dip created has no impact on the sharpness I am able to create. It depends a little on how you sharpen the blade. If you only push the blade in straight lines across the stone, wher ethe knife only is in contact witrh the stone when you push ( like Ray Mears teaches in one of his videoes), then it probably need to be flat. I keep the blade in contact with the stone in both directions and move the knife in a near cicrular motion. That way it does not matter much. My grandfathers sharpening stone was so well used it was completely rounded off. But his knives where always scary sharp.

    But I see that the knives are sort of leaving that perfect straight scandi edge, and moves towards a more rounded combination of a scandi/convex grind. But that is also due to finsihing off the process with leather paddle strop...anyway on my Mora 711 that i morst often sharpen as I use it most, it had become so pronounced that I had to straighten it off a little, but that was not very difficult, it just took a bit of time, as I had to remove more metal. Hehe that knife is now lacking at least 2-3mm of blade, compared to a new one. And it was the Mora I bought when I stopped throwing them away when unsharp...
    They are very cheap...3-4...so I used to buy them as fishing knives, and just chuck them when they went blunt or rusted.
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  10. #10
    Natural Born Bushcrafter Woody's Avatar
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    What a terrible thing to do , chucking all these perfectly fine knives away
    .....😲



    😂
    Last edited by Woody; 05-03-2017 at 12:35 AM.

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