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Thread: Want to learn Norwegian?

  1. #1
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Want to learn Norwegian?

    Lets start with a few words fro snow:

    1. Skare: Wet snow that has frozen
    2. Blautsnø, wet snow
    3. Blåstøde: snow that has water puddles in it
    4. kornsnø: Grainy snow
    5. Skavl: snow dune
    6. Sludd: Mix of snow and rain
    7. Djupsnø - deep snow
    8. Fokksnø - drifting snow
    9. Eitersnø - snow flake that is specific small and grainy, like small hail
    10. Fauker: snow that falls with separate spread out snow flakes
    11. Finsnø - fine snow
    12. Firn: Year old snow
    13. Fjautr: snø med tørre, lette flak
    14. Fjom, fjon (snø-) Snow
    15. Fjorsnø: Year old snow
    16. Flekkesnø - patches of snow
    17. Flinte (snø-): large snow flakes
    18. Flissnø: dry, fine snow
    19. Floke (snø-): larger snow flakes
    20. Flukse (snøflukse, -flysse, -flykse): even larger snow flakes
    21. Folge (snø-) : thin layer of snow
    22. Fonn (snøfonn, - fane, - fann) - snow drift
    23. Halvgote: Mix of snow, rain and sleet
    24. Hardang: snow that was wet but has frozen
    25. Heideskav: Snow that is drifting, but spread out,
    26. Heiske: light snow falling when the weather is almost clear.
    27. Himmelsfok: Hard falling snow falling straight down
    28. Iming: D.s.s. fjautr
    29. Ising: something between snow and ice
    30. Jordfok: Snow whipped into the air (by wind)
    31. Jøkleføre: new snow with an icy top.
    32. Jøkul: Glacier
    33. Kaldsnø: loose, dry snow on the ground
    34. Kjellføre: when the snow is deep enough to ski over marches and stone fences
    35. Klabbesnø: sticky snow
    36. Kornsnø - grainy snow
    37. Kovdam: The air is thick with snow, making it hard to breath.
    38. Krap or krav: small lumps of snow
    39. Kram snø: Moist snow, good for building snow men and making snow balls. :-)
    40. Lavsnø: snow on tree branches
    41. Laussnø - loose snow
    42. Mjell(snø): loose and dry snow on the ground
    43. Mylsnø: Snow that has frozen and then been chrushed
    44. Nysnø: new snow
    45. Pudder(snø): Powder snow
    46. Pulversnø : powder snow
    47. Raunsveig: snow on tree branches
    48. Rekkjingssnø: spoor snow
    49. Rennedrev: drifting snow
    50. Roksnø: drifting snow
    51. Skare: snow with a hard surface
    52. Slaps (slass): ekstra wet sleet
    53. Slette (slett, slatter, slat) : same as sleet
    54. Slettekave: snøkave snow with extra large flakes
    55. Sludd: sleet
    56. Smaladrepar: Wet snow that falls and freezes on the ground, and covering the grass so that sheep cant find food.
    57. Snø (snjo, sny o.l.): snow
    58. Snøbre: snow that does not melt for several years.
    59. Snøbus: extensive sow drifting
    60. Snødett: minor snow fall
    61. Snødrev (snødrift): snow drift
    62. Snøfall: falling snow
    63. Snøfar: very thin layer of snow
    64. Snøfille: large snow flake
    65. Snøflak : snow flake
    66. Snøfnugg: snow flake
    67. Snøfokk: snow blown by the wind
    68. Snøføyke: mindre enn snøfokk: a lesser snøfokk
    69. Snøfån: særs tynt snølag: very thin layer of snow
    70. sørpe: slush
    71. Snøgov (-gauv): see snøfokk
    72. Snøgraut: see sørpe
    73. Snøgrim: fine snow with a little wind
    74. Snøgrop: slush
    75. Snøgyrje: slush
    76. Snøhela: thin layer of snow
    77. Snøhim: very thin layer of snow
    78. Snøhære: light, thin fall of snow
    79. Snøkav: Snow with much wind
    80. Snøkjerring: very big snowflake (liiterally grandmother of snow)
    81. Snøklett: lots of snow falling
    82. Snøkreist: snow flakes falling spread in clear weather
    83. Snøkyng: dense snowfall
    84. Snøravl: thin snowfall
    85. Snørid: hard, snowy weather
    86. Snørók: snow devils, as in dust devils
    87. Snøskav: snow blown up from the ground
    88. Snøskavl: snow drift with a sharp edge
    89. Snøskrimsel: extremely thin layer of snow, allmost not visible
    90. Snøskute: snow drift with an over hang.
    91. Snøstorm: snow storm
    92. Snøvêr: snowy weather
    93. Snøæke: samanblåsen fonn t.d. i eit fjellskar: Densely packed snow drift
    94. Sor: mix of snow, water and sleet
    95. Sporsnø: spoor snow
    96. Stolpesnø: snow you can walk normaly in but have to stab your feet into.
    97. Sørpe(snø): water mixed snow
    98. Tørrsnø: dry snow
    99. Uppstøding: Snow with a strong enough surface to carry a person
    100. Vodl: slush.


    When you have learned these by heart we canb continue with the words for fish.
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

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  2. #2
    Could we do a quicker Norwegian lesson? How about the words for "drought" and "over crowded"?

  3. #3
    Tribal Elder BJ's Avatar
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    Anyone would think there was a lot of snow in Noway.
    “For the strength of the Pack is the Wolf, and the strength of the Wolf is the Pack.”

  4. #4
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CheddarMan View Post
    Could we do a quicker Norwegian lesson? How about the words for "drought" and "over crowded"?
    What are those?
    I have to look them up in the dictionary. English has so many words that are not tranlatable....
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by FishyFolk View Post
    What are those?
    I have to look them up in the dictionary. English has so many words that are not tranlatable....
    Sorry it was a lame attempt at a cross-lingual joke. I was suggesting that Norway never suffers from a lack of water and is beautifully uncrowded. Over here we have a ban on hose pipes if it is sunny for three days in a row, and everywhere is so crowded and populated, we don't have many wilderness areas at all really

  6. #6
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CheddarMan View Post
    Sorry it was a lame attempt at a cross-lingual joke. I was suggesting that Norway never suffers from a lack of water and is beautifully uncrowded. Over here we have a ban on hose pipes if it is sunny for three days in a row, and everywhere is so crowded and populated, we don't have many wilderness areas at all really
    GOT YOU!

    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  7. #7
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    I trust that you have had time to learn the few words fro snow.
    Now we go in to a more advanced subject of how to be polite in Norwegian.

    Here are a few phrases

    English: Excuse me, I did not quoite catch what you where saying. Could you please be kind and repeat?

    Norwegian: Hæ?



    English: Sorry I bumped into you like that, how terribly clumsy of me!

    Norwegian: Oi!


    English: It you! How lovely to see you!

    Norwegian: Hei!


    English: How are things with you and your family?

    Norwegian: Ellers?


    English: Excuse me, may I disturb you for a secund?
    Norwegian: Du!


    English: I would like a pint of *insert whatever you fancy*, please
    Norwegian: Pils!
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  8. #8
    Ranger Ehecatl's Avatar
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    Ha!

    Rune - we'll respond in kind by getting some lessons to you in what's called cockney rhyming slang.

    Example: That ice-cream was in a right two and eight after his walnut-whip down the apples and pears.

    "If you were to ask me what I consider to be my finest achievement, I could answer the question without hesitation: teaching." ~ Raymond Blanc.

  9. #9
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    It looks like I have to break out the kvad-kennings for the next lesson :-)
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  10. #10
    Ranger Ehecatl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FishyFolk View Post
    It looks like I have to break out the kvad-kennings for the next lesson :-)
    It's quite straight forward if you've been in the UK a long time, spend a lot of time in the south and are old enough to have watched a 1970s police series called The Sweeny (in fact this too is cockney rhyming slang too: Sweeny Todd = Flying Squad)

    So let's break down our example:
    That ice-cream was in a right two and eight after his walnut-whip down the apples and pears.

    Ice-cream freezer = geezer
    Two and eight = state
    Walnut whip = trip
    Apples and pears = stairs

    So, put it all together: The geezer (man) was in a right state after his trip down the stairs.

    It does make you wonder if he was Elephant's Trunk doesn't it.
    "If you were to ask me what I consider to be my finest achievement, I could answer the question without hesitation: teaching." ~ Raymond Blanc.

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