Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Need New Boots

  1. #1
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Connecticut ~ New England
    Posts
    2,465

    Need New Boots

    Hey chaps,

    My Timberland Mt. Maddsens have officially worn out. I can still use them, but the tread is pretty much completely smoothed out, and its former waterproof-ness is níl. I have two options, and money isn't much of an issue since I have a more than adequate living allowance from the federal government for my work. I'd rather keep the budget below $100, but if there isn't anything out there in my price range for what is best suited for me, I don't mind spending more.

    My two options are:

    To acquire similar footwear to the Timberlands - that is, mid-cut and waterproof, OR.....
    Go for something like a trail runner, essentially a breathable boot, something that can dry out relatively quick (overnight) and yet still be able to cope with rocky terrain.

    The conditions down here where I am working can be quite rugged. The trails are often washed out/flooded, especially in the Bell Mtn Wilderness, and there are lots of rocky sections all over the place in the wildernesses that I am managing. The frequent crossings of brooks and walking through the flooded sections would be made easier with a high waterproof boot, but I already have a pair of those; I did not bring them because the climate down here can become rather steamy during the summer months, and I would risk athlete's foot from all the sweat. In my experience, waterproof boots don't seem to dry out nearly as fast as breathable ones. I have considered Gore-tex, and I've heard both good and bad things about Gore-tex boots, but feel free to add your input.

    I'm more leaning towards something breathable, preferably a mid-cut boot. Excellent traction is a must.
    What are your thoughts?
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
    ~ Cody Lundin

  2. #2
    Ranger Ehecatl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Hinckley, Leicestershire
    Posts
    2,035
    I bought a pair of the Lowa Mountain boots about a year ago as my 20 year old British Army boots were getting a bit tired. (http://www.google.co.uk/aclk?sa=l&ai...6fo_s%3Dgplauk)

    Good points:
    They didn't really need breaking in - not so you would notice
    They keep my feet warm and dry
    They are really comfortable
    I'm not expecting to have to replace them

    Bad points:
    Slightly heavy
    Could be considered expensive, but you get what you pay for

    Would I recommend them? Yes, definately.
    "If you were to ask me what I consider to be my finest achievement, I could answer the question without hesitation: teaching." ~ Raymond Blanc.

  3. #3
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Connecticut ~ New England
    Posts
    2,465
    Interesting....you're the second person who has suggested them. I'm definitely going to consider Lowa. Hopefully by next month I'll have me new boots
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
    ~ Cody Lundin

  4. #4
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Connecticut ~ New England
    Posts
    2,465
    Well, I ended up purchasing Bog's Tumalo boots - all leather upper with rubber sole, decent tread. Got them from the Amazonian for just over $50 (bargain-buy ). Worst-case scenario, I can return them since the company has a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

    Right now I'm using a pair of sandal-boots, which are super breathable and have a lovely, flexible sole. Yesterday I took them out on to the Bell Mtn Wilderness across quite a rugged section of the trail, with lots of rocky sections, several brook crossings, and mud pies (when the trail turns into peanut-butter consistency mud). My feet got wet, obviously, but the sandal-boots dried out fast, as did my feet (thanks to an inner sock liner made by Fox River, meant to wear under merino socks for extra wicking power). These cost only $25. I won't be able to give a more honest and thorough talk about them until I've put many more miles on them, but so far I am impressed.

    But stout boots were a necessity since I often work with axes and saws, and per Forest Service safety regulations, I cannot use these tools without boots. I don't quite understand the reasoning that somehow your feet are better protected in boots than in something like a trail runner. If you miss with an axe, you're going to be in trouble regardless, unless you're wearing steel-toe boots and hit the plate first.
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
    ~ Cody Lundin

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •