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Thread: Need Help Identifying this tree

  1. #1
    Hobo Boone's Avatar
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    Need Help Identifying this tree

    Let me preface by saying i didn't just go cut down some random tree to carve with. This particular tree was halfway chewed down by a beaver ( there are lots of trees that beavers have chewed down where i live and have been sitting in the woods for a while so i thought i would make use of one, Im not quite sure what kind of tree this is though. It is quite soft, and the bark peels off in strips. The dead inner bark where the tree was chewed on was quite fiberous. Quite like a tulip poplar. I could not find any tulip poplar leaves on the ground though. If anybody could help me identify this i would be very thankful, Though I'm not quite sure if anybody will be able to identify this any help would be much appreciated. - Thanks
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    ''The man who goes afoot, prepared to camp anywhere and in any weather, is the most independent fellow on earth.'' - Horace Kephart

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  2. #2
    NaturalBushcraft Founder Ashley Cawley's Avatar
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    Hi Boone,

    On first glance the bark texture reminded me of a Holly that we have here in the UK, although in your case this probably isn't Holly. Holly has waxy, prickly leaves, red berries and poisonous wood so not suitable for spoon making, but I would let you worry you as I doubt you are dealing with Holly, its just something which jumped to my mind when seeing that bark.

    Seeing as your in Canada I will leave it to members of our community which might be closer to you. Were there any other signs on the floor? Dead leaves, nuts, casings, don't suppose you have a picture of the whole tree? It's size or structure might help identify it.
    Ashley Cawley

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  3. #3
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    Does the wood have a fragrance to it? I notice the pink/purplish tinge in the heartwood that suggests a type of Juniper. Seeing as how you're in Canada, my guess would be either Eastern Red-Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) or Common Juniper (J. communis). This would also explain the fibrous bark and the softness of the wood.
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  4. #4
    Hobo Boone's Avatar
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    Not much of a fragrance , just smells earthy. Also there are no coniferous trees in the woodlands by my house, so its definitely not cedar. I didn't take a picture of it before i cut it down but there are more of those trees near where i cut it down. There were no nuts on the ground. Do you think i should gather some of the leaves off of the ground and take some pictures ?
    ''The man who goes afoot, prepared to camp anywhere and in any weather, is the most independent fellow on earth.'' - Horace Kephart

    ''The more you know, The less you have to carry. The less you know, the more you have to carry.'' -Mors Kochanski

  5. #5
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    Hmmmmmmmm....that's a toughie. Did the colour of the wood change from when you cut it? Reading over what you first stated, the tree was growing near a water source, so me thinks some type of Alder.
    Willow is also a possibility, though there are lots of different species of Willow that grow in your part of Canada.
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
    ~ Cody Lundin

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