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Thread: What is your stove preference and why?

  1. #1
    Native -Tim-'s Avatar
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    What is your stove preference and why?

    As the title suggests, what stove do you prefer to use and why?

    Me, I love my Trangia, the meths version. Why? because it is simplicity in itself and quiet. It can get soaking wet and still work.I know this as I had lost one burner, about a year or so later when I dredged my pond I found it, shook it filled it full of meths and it worked!

    here is my Trangia in the Rhinog mountains



    and twenty years later...


    I also use a fire box, mine is a Yukon for the same reasons as the Trangia

    Here we used two to make Haggis chilli.



    When we are camping in the campervan I use a Cobb Oven again, no moving parts and quiet.
    More often as not I use it as a "campsite friendly fire"

    Seen here making a toastie whilst warming up the "dutchie"


    I am aiming my sights on a new stove, a rocket stove for when wood is a little more scarce.....

    Whats yours?

    Cheers
    Tim
    "Travel a thousand miles by train and you are a brute;
    pedal five hundred on a bicycle and you remain basically a bourgeois;
    paddle a hundred in a canoe and you are already a child of nature."
    .

  2. #2
    Tribal Elder midas's Avatar
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    I like my "Rocket Stove."Keeps fire of ground.burns almost anything.Wooden pelleted katlit,when twigs are in short supply.
    Radiates heat well.easy to regulate,ie turn into wind or out of wind.Click image for larger version. 

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    If I have to "carry"the stove then tend to use a Brass Meths/Ethanol Stove.

    Third picture a damascus kneck knife.dont know how it sneaked in????
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by midas; 06-01-2015 at 08:21 PM.
    You are never too old to learn!. A SURVIVER!

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  3. #3
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Well, I sort of like all my stoves for different reasons.

    I own 2 Optimus 111 stoves. Those are my winter stoves. And I was first introduced to them in the army where we cooked on them, and used them for heating up our button tents...a button tent is a poncho tent, similar to the polish lavvu. (If you do this, make sure someone is always awake to keep an eye on the stove). Anyway theya re very good in cold weather and can burn both petrol, parrafine and with an adapater- alcohol. In the Norwegian army we used F-34 which is the same as JP-8 a jet engine fuel :-) excellent stove but high maintenance, and may require some regular fetling to keep in working order. Also quite heavy, hence my winter use of it. In winter I use a pulk.

    Then it's another multifuel. A Gos-systems flexi-fuel. If you ever come across one used...DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT purchase. It's a devil when used with parrafine...but actually quite nice with gas. Will work nicely with butane in cold temps as well as it has a pre-heating tube. I keep it mostly for sentimental reasons. First burner I owned that was not a trangia, and I have used it in my work, as it has heated a brew for me in Africa, middle east, south and south east asia, as well as on trips at home. And I will use it again :-)

    I have owned several trangia kits. And just recently picked up a banged up but serviceable trangia 25 (or is it a 27?) complete with meths burner that had a pre-heating burner atatched. Good idea. I have owned a few, but left them around the world for my colleagues as I left various missions. Yes love the burner, and that brings me on to...

    ...a cpy of the burner, that resided with my solo cook kit. A full trangia set is not so heavy, specially if you leave some of the pots at home. But it is bulky. My solo kit fits in my little day bag. So for a couple of years I brought it everywhere.

    But I like a wood fire, and not wanting to dirty up my alu pots, brought some stainless steel ones + a wood gas stove. I love that one. And use it frequently on my little day trips. Together with an GSI kettle it has replaced the solo kit.

    Then I have 2-3 differnet very cheap gas burners, all from china via ebay. They work well, and I have used them in the summer when the family is with me and we just want a quick brew. Got an adpter that will fit one of them in the Trangia set, but need to test that :-)

    Anyway, those are all my stoves, I love them all, but if I have to pick one, the Optimus 111 wins. :-)
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

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    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  4. #4
    Moderator jus_young's Avatar
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    When permitted then it has to be an open fire, if it needs to be contained then I use my Honey Stove from backpackinglight. More often than not though my needs are dictated by the fact that I am undertaking a hike or expedition of some kind with the Scouts or DofE. In these situations then I have to use either meths or ethanol in the trusty Trangia stove with either the trivet or Honey Stove.

    I hate gas stoves. I own a few, from the Trangia to a minuscule 46gram titanium burner but the flame is too controlled and contained. It is essentially lifeless and has no soul.

  5. #5
    Native -Tim-'s Avatar
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    "Third picture a damascus neck knife dont know how it sneaked in??" Sneaky pic of a nice knife

    "Anyway, those are all my stoves, I love them all" There is something about stoves that my wife just can't understand...

    "It is essentially lifeless and has no soul." that comment just nails it

    I do have an Optimus hunter, that is about 20 years + old, nearly burnt my Mom and Dads house down with it when I fired it up in my bedroom (of the time) can't get myself to like it and when it gets going it roars like a monster and glows cherry red.

    Cheers
    Tim
    "Travel a thousand miles by train and you are a brute;
    pedal five hundred on a bicycle and you remain basically a bourgeois;
    paddle a hundred in a canoe and you are already a child of nature."
    .

  6. #6
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    Most of my camps are stealth, and one of my favourite cooking companions has to be my alcohol pop can stove. No smoke, it's efficient, ultralight, and silent. I don't have to mess about looking for firewood - I can get something hot to drink within minutes, and if I want to, I can cook my meal over it.
    If things are more relaxed, or if I want to take the risk, I'll bring out the Emberlit. I positively adore this stove . Yes, it is meant to be a wood burner, but it can be paired with the pop can stove with disassembled parts. The two cross pieces at the top can be put together as a pot stand for the pop can stove, the square bottom piece can be used as a priming platform, and the interlocking walls can be snapped together as a windscreen (sometimes it can be a bit rickety, so I always bring an aluminum foil wind screen as a back-up). I can use the Emberlit year round, and it doesn't need much fuel to keep it going. It's real handy in the summer as the smoke helps keep mozzies and gnats away.
    Last edited by OakAshandThorn; 09-01-2015 at 06:33 PM. Reason: Ooooops
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

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  7. #7
    Stove depends on what I'm doing.
    If out for a walk I take my Jetboil as it's quick easy and don't get funny looks.
    If out fishing I take my storm kettle, feeding it gives me something to do when the fishing is slow.
    In cold weather I take my Optinus Nova, noisy but reliable and controllable.

    If I could it would be an open fire every time.

  8. #8
    Native -Tim-'s Avatar
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    I did forget my Frontier stove.......
    Why? It heats the Tipi up and cooks food, a great toy



    Cheers
    Tim
    "Travel a thousand miles by train and you are a brute;
    pedal five hundred on a bicycle and you remain basically a bourgeois;
    paddle a hundred in a canoe and you are already a child of nature."
    .

  9. #9
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Tim- View Post
    "Third picture a damascus neck knife dont know how it sneaked in??" Sneaky pic of a nice knife

    "Anyway, those are all my stoves, I love them all" There is something about stoves that my wife just can't understand...

    "It is essentially lifeless and has no soul." that comment just nails it

    I do have an Optimus hunter, that is about 20 years + old, nearly burnt my Mom and Dads house down with it when I fired it up in my bedroom (of the time) can't get myself to like it and when it gets going it roars like a monster and glows cherry red.

    Cheers
    Tim
    Ah, you got one with a roarer burner. Very reliable, and yes...never ever fire up these inside.
    The norwegian army uses these to ehat their tents...they give about 2500 w of heat :-)

    Here is how to fire it up safely:

    Last edited by FishyFolk; 07-01-2015 at 05:05 PM.
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  10. #10
    Tribal Elder midas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Tim- View Post
    I did forget my Frontier stove.......
    Why? It heats the Tipi up and cooks food, a great toy



    Cheers
    Tim
    mmmmmmmmmmmmmcan smell the bacon n feel the heat from here Tim!!!
    You are never too old to learn!. A SURVIVER!

    "Peasants Rule,and your Knife is your Tool."
    "A Knifeless man is a Lifeless man".Nordic Proverb.

    Support The GURKA WELFARE TRUST.1815 to 2015 200 years of Service to the Crown

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