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Thread: What is it with mini-wood stoves.

  1. #1

    Talking What is it with mini-wood stoves.

    I have notice a proliferation of, IMHO, ludicrously small wood stoves. I cannot see the point over say using meths when you get down to that size. I have a wildstove's woodgas stove and that seems a decent size and absolutely slayed the 4 dogs bushcooker I used to have. I also have a firebox, my favorite but it is heavy. But these dinky little ones of three inches or the Ti hex one's with little doors - what is the point?

    My brew up kit consists of a clic-stand, trangia burner (old faithful) and a stanley Bushpot thingee (excellent and underrated for idealogical reasons) and it works a treat. OK if I ran out of fuel I would be stuck or I would have to make a fire but I don't need something the size of espresso cup to do that in.

    I am not trying to raise a storm or cause offence and I accept that some people might like that sort of thing but I cannot see a truly practical rational.

    Anyone care to enlighten me please?

  2. #2
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    I think most poeple use them as windscreens and pot holders for their meths stoves...and then if meths run out they can use bits of wood instead...but yeah, then I'd rather just build a small fire.
    But sometimes that is not possible due to the fire hazard. One of these mini stoves you can just plaze on a small stone and be fairly safe that the fire won't spread. But personally I preffer a larger one...
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
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  3. #3
    One thing you have got watch...before you go into the woods...is people who profess to know Everything about the woods and want You to Buy things from them...There's Nothing Better than taking a Free Stroll in the Woods and making Up Your Own Mind as to What You Will Need...If Camping Out.....

  4. #4
    Natural Born Bushcrafter saxonaxe's Avatar
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    With some kit I sometimes get the feeling that people buy it almost to experiment with. They see it on You Tube or somewhere, it's described as the answer to everyones dream, so they buy it. I read an article on Honey stoves, casually mentioned it to my Daughter and next thing I know I got a pressie...
    Daft thing, you need an engineering degree to assemble it and three hands to put the various sections together by which time I could have lit a fire, had my grub and been on the trail again...

  5. #5
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saxonaxe View Post
    With some kit I sometimes get the feeling that people buy it almost to experiment with. They see it on You Tube or somewhere, it's described as the answer to everyones dream, so they buy it. I read an article on Honey stoves, casually mentioned it to my Daughter and next thing I know I got a pressie...
    Daft thing, you need an engineering degree to assemble it and three hands to put the various sections together by which time I could have lit a fire, had my grub and been on the trail again...
    Ha ha, the story of my life. I got a shed full of useless stuff I've bought that I've used once or twice. It's all listed in the "What have you bought now thread" lol.

    Well, some of it would be quite usefull, if I did not allready have a better thing...or if it was not replaced by something I felt worked better for me.
    I gu8ess that's part of the problem too.

    But take a celebrated item like the humble Zebra billy can. If you boil water in it, it's almost impossible to pour the hot water into a cup without spilling half of it, and/or risk scolding yourself in the process.
    And that useless handle takes upp tons of space. Yes you can modify it or bring or make a tool to hold it with. But why not just get a tea kettle instead? One width a big lid so you can also cook your stew or noodles or what people cook in their billy cans.

    Oh my negativity....have to work on that, lol
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  6. #6
    Most people do experiment....that's part of camping...but, to be bombarded by sales reps that have never gone camping is a rather large turn-off....

  7. #7
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    My Emberlit is fairly small but not tiny, and not only can I burn wood in it, but I can also use the parts for a denatured alcohol/meths system. A lot of consideration went into that purchase. But personally, anything smaller than the Emberlit Mini is just too small for the cooking capabilities I would want...but that's just me.
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

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  8. #8
    Samuel Hearne Bernie's Avatar
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    What size is that OAT? Looks about the same size as my Nimblewill Nomad Little Dandy Wood Stove.

    As for the purpose/usefulness of a small wood burning stove, I think others have said that they make great wind shields and ground protectors for meths pop can stoves, but I see another benefit: learning to manage a small fire is a good skill to have. We might not always have the luxury of ample fuel (purchased or found in the woods). I'll be the first to admit that I'm not nearly as capable at maintaining a small fire as a huge roaring bonfire with a bed of coals that could dry soaked wood sufficiently to burn it.

    One of the things I like most about my storm kettle is that it uses very little fuel, can burn almost anything, and is fairly easy to manage thanks to the large chimney that the kettle is.

  9. #9
    Tribal Elder Tigger004's Avatar
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    I agree with Bernie that chimney type kettles are ideal for boiling water, I have a large Ghillie with cooking attachments (I don't get on with using it to cook on, it needs to be full of water....ask Mr Fish )

    For just a brew my "Mkettle" is great and my most grabbed choice, it's very quick,cleanish and smells divine . (and it will work in pouring rain)

    But for cooking I regularly use one of two choices my wild woodgas stove or Nimblewill 6" type (which many of you would have seen my take on it's build/design on this forum) Both make excellent wood stoves and also wind shields for a meths burner, my nimblewill nearly fits in a vinyl CD wallet ( it goes in but is difficult to get out )

    I would agree with Old Dog and Bernie that 3" stoves would be very difficult to manage, I've tried homemade gasifiers and they will burn out if not carefully watched and tended
    Campfires are best shared with friends.

  10. #10
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tigger004 View Post
    I agree with Bernie that chimney type kettles are ideal for boiling water, I have a large Ghillie with cooking attachments (I don't get on with using it to cook on, it needs to be full of water....ask Mr Fish )

    For just a brew my "Mkettle" is great and my most grabbed choice, it's very quick,cleanish and smells divine . (and it will work in pouring rain)

    But for cooking I regularly use one of two choices my wild woodgas stove or Nimblewill 6" type (which many of you would have seen my take on it's build/design on this forum) Both make excellent wood stoves and also wind shields for a meths burner, my nimblewill nearly fits in a vinyl CD wallet ( it goes in but is difficult to get out )

    I would agree with Old Dog and Bernie that 3" stoves would be very difficult to manage, I've tried homemade gasifiers and they will burn out if not carefully watched and tended
    I was very sceptical to wood gas stoves until I got a proper one that worked. But yes, they are a bit tedious to use. Specially when things are a bit damp to begin with. I've not tested mine in winter conditions yet, but think I will prefer to use my Optimus 111...acttually just given both of mine a once over to make sure they are ready for the winter which is already here.

    I could use meths stoves. The only count against them is that they can be hard to light in the cold. But not if you know the tricks. And I use meths to pre-heat the optimus anyway :-)
    But it's something special about the real deal. Same with those little wood stoves. They do give off that cosy glow and the smell of a real fire. Sometimes it does not feel like a real day out if I do not come home smelling of wood smoke :-)

    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

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