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Thread: Jam wine

  1. #11
    Moderator jus_young's Avatar
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    Big glass jar that the fermentation is done in.

  2. #12
    Tribal Elder Chubbs's Avatar
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    jacko

    A Demijohn is is a type of glass carboy which is used to ferment in. They usually hold just over a UK gallon of liquid and are sealed with a bung and airlock, half filled with water which shows the carbon dioxide escaping as bubbles when your brew is fermenting.

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    Last edited by Chubbs; 06-10-2013 at 11:39 AM.

  3. #13
    Cool, thanks for that guys!!

  4. #14
    Tribal Elder shepherd's Avatar
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    is the yeast and enzyme easy to get hold of?

  5. #15
    Tribal Elder Kernowek Scouser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by woodstock View Post
    5 jars of tescos finest mega cheap mixed fruit jar at 29p a jar
    pectolitic enzyme
    high speed yeast or turbo yeast
    1 gallon of water.

    Dissolve the jam in boiling water let cool and add to Demi john add pectolitic enzyme and yeast,jobs a goodun

    no need for added sugar, but extra stuff like rose petels or elder flowers might be nice. Ready in about two weeks. and strong
    If this is the beverage you very kindly let me have a mug (or seven) of, it was rather good and I would definitely recommend folks try some.

    Now where did I put those demi-johns?
    Ansum La

  6. #16
    Native beermaker's Avatar
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    Sounds like an interesting recipe! As the handle suggests I make beer (and lots of it!) but just getting into wine making so will definitely try this!

    Shepherd - you can get all that stuff from Wilkinsons as they have a home brew section, or find your local home brew shop. Failing that, my local shop does excellent mail order www.hopandgrape.co.uk (must add the usual disclaimer - no affiliation, not employed or rewarded, etc! just had 15 years of excellent service from them)

    I make wine from fruit juice - pour a litre of white grape juice and a litre of the fruit juice of your choice (Orange is surprisingly good) into a Demijohn. Heat up 1.5 litres of water in a pan, dissolve in 1 kg white sugar. Pour into the Demijohn and when cooled, add wine yeast, yeast nutrient, tannin (strong cup of black tea), Citric acid (teaspoon of lemon juice) and pectolase and stick a bubbler in the top. Once fermentation has subsided, usually after four or five days, top up to the neck with cooled boiled water. Leave until fermentation is complete, add a crushed campden tablet, spoon of potassium sorbate and wine finings. When the wine is clear, bottle up and enjoy!

    Works with pretty much any juice - so far I've tried apple and elderflower, red cherry, orange, apple, pomegranate, and forest fruits.

  7. #17
    Tribal Elder Rasputin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jacko1066 View Post
    Sounds awesome!!

    What is a Demi John please?
    Its a 1 gallon glass bottle / jug like a scumpy jug and you put a bung in it with an airlockatached to ferment the contents http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Glass-demi...item417728217d that should help, Ken
    Ne te confundant illigitimi It is always a pleasure to see what you can make !, instead of buying it ready made. R Proenneke.

  8. #18
    Tribal Elder Rasputin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasputin View Post
    Its a 1 gallon glass bottle / jug like a scumpy jug and you put a bung in it with an airlockatached to ferment the contents http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Glass-demi...item417728217d that should help, Ken
    I should read the rest of the post 1st, I see its been answered allready, oh well
    Ne te confundant illigitimi It is always a pleasure to see what you can make !, instead of buying it ready made. R Proenneke.

  9. #19
    Tribal Elder Rasputin's Avatar
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    Made allsorts over the years and some of the ones that dont sound promising have turned out brill, for instance pea pod, carrot and dandelion are 3 cracking wines not to mention elderberry or elderflower champagne. Hic. How you doing fella, not damaged desen lately,lol
    Works with pretty much any juice - so far I've tried apple and elderflower, red cherry, orange, apple, pomegranate, and forest fruits.
    Ne te confundant illigitimi It is always a pleasure to see what you can make !, instead of buying it ready made. R Proenneke.

  10. #20
    Tribal Elder Chubbs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beermaker View Post

    I make wine from fruit juice - pour a litre of white grape juice and a litre of the fruit juice of your choice (Orange is surprisingly good) into a Demijohn. Heat up 1.5 litres of water in a pan, dissolve in 1 kg white sugar. Pour into the Demijohn and when cooled, add wine yeast, yeast nutrient, tannin (strong cup of black tea), Citric acid (teaspoon of lemon juice) and pectolase and stick a bubbler in the top. Once fermentation has subsided, usually after four or five days, top up to the neck with cooled boiled water. Leave until fermentation is complete, add a crushed campden tablet, spoon of potassium sorbate and wine finings. When the wine is clear, bottle up and enjoy!

    Works with pretty much any juice - so far I've tried apple and elderflower, red cherry, orange, apple, pomegranate, and forest fruits.
    The recipe above makes a cracking wine. Personally, I don't use any more than 800g of sugar per gallon but it will still leave me with an average ABV of 12%. New brewers that follow this recipe sometimes question the amount of juice being used, and add more than listed. If you stick to what recipe Beermaker has provided, you will be pleasantly surprised with the final product once chilled before drinking.

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