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Thread: Phone apps for Android

  1. #1

    Phone apps for Android

    Yeah here we go,

    I think it fits best here. What bushcrafting related Apps do you carry on your android phone?

    I carry basicly none yet, except a standalone offline Mapapp called Maverick.

    That's why i started this thread to see if somebody has recommendations.

    Why would I need such thing in bushcrafting you may ask? You don't; but it is making me way relaxter to know I could call someone, if I am in trouble or have something to navigate me home after my map& compass navigationskills failed and my gps broke...highly unlikely still possible...

    So let's get this discussion rolling.

    Cheers,
    Corbeau

    Btw it would be nice if you add if it's a free app or not...
    Last edited by Corbeau; 16-06-2013 at 02:40 PM. Reason: p.s.
    I am in fact a Hobbit in all but size. I like gardens, trees, and unmechanized farmlands; I smoke a pipe, and like good plain food, (...); I like, and even dare to wear in these dull days, ornamental waistcoats. I am fond of mushrooms (out of a field); have a very simple sense of humor (which even my appreciative critics find tiresome); I go to bed late and get up late (when possible.) - J.R.R.Tolkien

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Corbeau View Post

    Why would I need such thing in bushcrafting you may ask? You don't; ..highly unlikely still possible...
    Kind of answered your own questions there.......
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  3. #3
    Tribal Elder ADz's Avatar
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    Don't worry there is plenty of decent outdoors/bushcraft/foraging apps that are really usefull to have on you from GPS/mapping/plant ID/fungi/first aid/knots/survival/emergency location senders etc.

    Ill post some info and links for you when I'm home.
    Last edited by ADz; 16-06-2013 at 04:37 PM.
    "Before you judge a man, walk a mile in his shoes; after that, who cares?! He's a mile away and you've got his shoes!​​"

  4. #4
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    emergency location senders ? Like to look at them......

    Currently one has been made, designed and used by UK MR teams called SARLoC it sends a link to the lost persons smart phone, they log on to the link and it then sends their grid reference....

    it still relies on the missing group to ring 999 first...wouldnt it be better not to get lost in the first place ? Theres an easy way round that learn to read a map, learn how to use a compass, astral and natural navigation and............. stop relying on technology, the free ride in a big yellow helicopter, or the free guiding service....
    Last edited by Silverback; 16-06-2013 at 05:37 PM.
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  5. #5
    Moderator Adam Savage's Avatar
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    I agree, there are some useful apps out there. Far too many of them to list, and many are very much the same as each other (i.e. fungi apps are all similar, bird id apps seem to include the same species), so it's not fair of me to suggest one over the other.

    What must be remembered is, these apps are for reference, not dependence. First aid apps seem pointless to me, as it's one of those areas where speed can be of the essence. You should familiarise yourself with basic first aid before you head out.

    As for plant and fungi id, I wouldn't trust the photos in the apps to give a firm identification. Far too much variation in each genus, as well as similarities between genera.

    The navigational apps are very useful. Great for logging location of edibles you come across, nesting sites that you may wish to revisit, sources of fresh water, or even nice camping areas.
    Jack of all trades-Master of none

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  6. #6
    Ok, let me clarify a bit:
    I'm totally aware that knowledge is king. Especially the one in your brain and not in books, apps, articles or whatsoever. That said, what i wanted to start here:

    I wanted to make a database of usefull apps that could help you out or are just a nice read. Saying yes they are out there go find them yourself is not what I ment this thread to be.

    I did quite a bit of research but just trying 10-15 fungi apps comparing them with book and with knowledge you already have is interesting but sadly not really practical, if you don't have the time for it, and sadly my time is EXTREMLY limited.

    So the idea was to start an exchange where people write why they use for example one app over the other.

    Obviously you should not depend on electric devices, just for the reason they are electric, but let's be honest 99,5% of us are carrying a cell phone out in the bush and a rough guess is that at least 40% of those carry a smartphone. So why not make an constructive exchange.

    My reasoning for excample of picking Maverick over other offline Mapapps was simply because I like the look and the possibility to select different maps for different types of "expeditions". For example there are bicycle maps available for germany and hicking maps for japan. You basicly choose the mapprovider out of a list of 15 or so...

    And in Japan I just slam my prepaid into my phone and use WiFi to preload the maps of where I'm going.

    Electricity is not a problem in Japan. Finding free WiFi and the addresssystem of Japan on the other hand can be, let's say it nicely, quite annoying, because streets don't have names: an address consists out of: Land, Area, (registration area), City, Suburb, Quarternumber, Blocknumber, Housenumber, Appartmentnumber, and the only thing you see in the streets are housenumbers and sometimes in what quarter you are ...

    So setting a waypoint and having the maps bloody helps.

    First aid apps are like most of the knowledge apps in my opinion not a reference, that you use while being out there, but they are a nice read to get your memory refreshed while for example comuting, so please include them also in the recommendations, if you have a good one.


    Sorry for the wall of text.
    Last edited by Corbeau; 16-06-2013 at 06:16 PM. Reason: Last line
    I am in fact a Hobbit in all but size. I like gardens, trees, and unmechanized farmlands; I smoke a pipe, and like good plain food, (...); I like, and even dare to wear in these dull days, ornamental waistcoats. I am fond of mushrooms (out of a field); have a very simple sense of humor (which even my appreciative critics find tiresome); I go to bed late and get up late (when possible.) - J.R.R.Tolkien

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    I have a Medical Memo in A5..its laminated so its waterproof, I can write on it with marker or chinagraph and it doesnt run out of electricity. First Aid like navigation is a skill that degrades, it has to be practiced as well as read. Reading about First Aid is no substitute for a course, appropriate training and of course regular practice and updates.

    I have laminated maps of the area I mainly operate in..they are waterproof and dont run out of electricity It can be used as a sit mat and in extremis as overhead cover. I have a GPS for position fixes it uses the same batteries as my head torch and hand torch.

    I have a compass, if that fails I can navigate by features, landmarks, astral features and the sun. As someone who can navigate i only need to be able to access local mapping to be able to get around....not requirement to do it by phone app really.

    I have a fungi id book and a wild food book, both not very heavy and with clear concise pictures and descriptions..dont need electricity....

    I do have a smartphone...most of the time in the upland areas in which I live there is no phone signal never mind data...downloadable content is pointless..
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  8. #8
    One with Nature JonnyP's Avatar
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    theres a point....angry birds
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  10. #10
    Peasant Kit Mac's Avatar
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    The only bushy related app I have is the OS Atlas. Gives you a road atlas, 1:50k and 1:25k OS maps of the UK for a couple of quid. It only works with WiFi but its handy to be able to plan route and check out possible trip locations before buying the paper map.

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