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Thread: Wild Camping/Hiking Newbie - Need Some Advice

  1. #1
    Tribal Elder ADz's Avatar
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    Question Wild Camping/Hiking Newbie - Need Some Advice

    Hi all,

    Newbie here looking for some advice from experienced campers or experts.

    Within next few weeks I will hopefully jumping on bus and going to North York Moors to do some short hiking/wild camping solo or with a friend. This will be my first time wild camping excluding 1 nighters in local fields for a laugh/drink. I am very respectful so will not be leaving any rubbish and leaving area as I found it. Ideally will try and find a nice secluded spot away from roads etc.

    I have bought myself various bits and bobs so far like 80L backpack, tent, sleeping bag/mat, Trangia stove/set, The Pocket Stove, Fire Steel, Mess tins, Crusader mug, Folding Saw, Survival Knife, Small multi-tool. I intent to get some more things here and there like a hydration bag for example.

    Does anybody have any advice on a good location for a newbie to start hike or any nice secluded areas or woodlands where we can camp (pref co-ordinates/gmap), what other equipment I should take or any other general advice would be very welcome and appreciated.

    Regards
    Adam.
    Last edited by ADz; 30-07-2012 at 01:01 AM.

  2. #2
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    I got one pice of advice if you wan't to be comfortable hauling that 80 litre backpack of yours full of kit. Take it for a walk a few times before you set out on your expedition so you are used to carrying it.
    It will get you longer out on D-day...
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  3. #3
    Tribal Elder ADz's Avatar
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    Thanks for advice bud. It is a large pack but my kit itself isnt that heavy. Once I am happy with kit I may end up getting a smaller pack if needed but the 80L one seems comfertable to wear from few times I have had it on, I may go for a walk down a track near me see how it feels. Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Personal First Aid kit, nothing massive. Things you MAY want to CONSIDER adding

    Plasters, Large wound dressings, (a must really especially where you're using sharp stuff)
    Tampons - Non Applicator Cheap ones are better...lighting fires and penetrating / stab /GS wound dressings
    Painkillers i.e paracetamol, Paracodol, over the counter stuff.
    Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatories, i.e Ibuprofen, Diclofenac (Voltarol)
    Dioralyte sachets - great for rehydrating once again these are over the counter
    Anti Diarrhoea tablets the squits in the field ain't fun.
    Anti Histamines, can be bought over the counter again (unless you have them on script).
    Cohesive bandage (vet wrap - sold in pound shops) great for lower leg support after sprains.

    Duct tape ! Not lots but a couple or 3 metres wrapped round some plastic or another item. Has so many applications in Wilderness / Remote / Outdoor / Mountain First Aid e.g as a wound closure, and splinting for example and on top of that for repairing thermarests, hydration bladders and even rucksacks.

    Don't forget any prescription meds you may have to take.
    On your person somewhere you COULD have some personal details... it helps if you're found unconscious or unable to answer.

    There are 2 Mountain Rescue Teams covering the NYM National Park.... Cleveland and Scarborough & Rydale

    To contact them in an emergency dial 999 ask for the Police then Mountain Rescue

    http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mountain-advice

    http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mo.../mobile-phones

    http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mo...se-of-accident
    [

  5. #5
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Oh and if you're hiking shoes/ boots are new too, start wearing them now to walk them in. Nothing is worse than setting out on a long haul in new foot wear. Bring blister tape...I recomend Compeed.
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  6. #6
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    Map/Compass, and the ability to use them. Don't rely on your mobile phones mapping unless you have Memory Map or Viewranger or similar.

    If you are relying on an electronic mapping device such as a SatMap / PDA (insert electronic jiggery pokery of choice) then spare batteries and/or solar charger that works.

    Head and/or hand torch (I have a preference for head torches as it keeps my hands free) - spare batteries again

    Whistle.

    The international I need help signal is 6 blasts on a whistle or flashes of a torch repeated at one min intervals.

    The NYM is a tick haven as well so wear long trousers check yourself for ticks and if you find one then this http://www.otom.com/how-to-remove-a-tick MAY be of use

    for more info http://www.bada-uk.org/defence/toptentips.php

    The English midgie is out and about in large numbers too so some kind of insect repellent MAY be a useful addition as would TCP or other antiseptic wipe/cream/preparation
    Last edited by Silverback; 30-07-2012 at 12:10 PM.
    [

  7. #7
    Bushman jbrown14's Avatar
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    Good advice so far, here's my two cents (or pence...I'm a Yank )

    Leave an itinerary with someone you trust. Give that person either a map with your route hilited, or a written description of your intended route and establish a contact time when you will contact that person to let them know you made it out alive. Use the information Sapper gave you and give it to your friend so they'll have it on hand to know exactly what to do in case you don't contact them at the agreed upon time.

    The most important part of this plan is: DON'T DEVIATE FROM YOUR ROUTE.

    This is something I implement every time I go out whether it's a solo day-hike or a multi-day hike with friends. I give my wife a map with the route hilited as well as a written description of the hike, I write the emergency dispatch number for the New York State DEC on the map, and I usually give myself several hours added on to the time I really think I'll get back.

    My best piece of advice is, have fun, and don't take your self too seriously. There's a lot to see and do out there, enjoy it.

    Best of luck!

    Josh

  8. #8
    Bushman jbrown14's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapper4083 View Post
    The international I need help signal is 6 blasts on a whistle or flashes of a torch repeated at one min intervals.
    Ok, I actually had to look this up to confirm what you're talking about because I've learned that it's always 3 blasts on a whistle or flashes.

    Looks like it's in the UK and the European Alps that it's 6 blasts. Well, I learned something today.

  9. #9
    Tribal Elder ADz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapper4083 View Post
    Personal First Aid kit, nothing massive. Things you MAY want to CONSIDER adding

    Plasters, Large wound dressings, (a must really especially where you're using sharp stuff)
    Tampons - Non Applicator Cheap ones are better...lighting fires and penetrating / stab /GS wound dressings
    Painkillers i.e paracetamol, Paracodol, over the counter stuff.
    Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatories, i.e Ibuprofen, Diclofenac (Voltarol)
    Dioralyte sachets - great for rehydrating once again these are over the counter
    Anti Diarrhoea tablets the squits in the field ain't fun.
    Anti Histamines, can be bought over the counter again (unless you have them on script).
    Cohesive bandage (vet wrap - sold in pound shops) great for lower leg support after sprains.

    Duct tape ! Not lots but a couple or 3 metres wrapped round some plastic or another item. Has so many applications in Wilderness / Remote / Outdoor / Mountain First Aid e.g as a wound closure, and splinting for example and on top of that for repairing thermarests, hydration bladders and even rucksacks.

    Don't forget any prescription meds you may have to take.
    On your person somewhere you COULD have some personal details... it helps if you're found unconscious or unable to answer.

    There are 2 Mountain Rescue Teams covering the NYM National Park.... Cleveland and Scarborough & Rydale

    To contact them in an emergency dial 999 ask for the Police then Mountain Rescue

    http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mountain-advice

    http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mo.../mobile-phones

    http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mo...se-of-accident

    Thanks, I'll definitely be buying a first aid kit and make sure it has some extras you mentioned.


    Quote Originally Posted by FishyFolk View Post
    Oh and if you're hiking shoes/ boots are new too, start wearing them now to walk them in. Nothing is worse than setting out on a long haul in new foot wear. Bring blister tape...I recomend Compeed.
    Thats a really good point, I planned on buying some boots shortly before going but didnt even cross my mind to break them in. Thanks.


    Quote Originally Posted by Sapper4083 View Post
    Map/Compass, and the ability to use them. Don't rely on your mobile phones mapping unless you have Memory Map or Viewranger or similar.

    If you are relying on an electronic mapping device such as a SatMap / PDA (insert electronic jiggery pokery of choice) then spare batteries and/or solar charger that works.

    Head and/or hand torch (I have a preference for head torches as it keeps my hands free) - spare batteries again

    Whistle.

    The international I need help signal is 6 blasts on a whistle or flashes of a torch repeated at one min intervals.

    The NYM is a tick haven as well so wear long trousers check yourself for ticks and if you find one then this http://www.otom.com/how-to-remove-a-tick MAY be of use

    for more info http://www.bada-uk.org/defence/toptentips.php

    The English midgie is out and about in large numbers too so some kind of insect repellent MAY be a useful addition as would TCP or other antiseptic wipe/cream/preparation
    I plan on taking a OS map aswell as compass. Not used one before but will swat up. I have a GalaxyS2 and a Galaxy Tab 7 so will likley try out Memory Map/ViewRanger apps, have you tried either, you got a preference?

    I have a small dynamo torch but plan to have a head torch aswell.


    Quote Originally Posted by jbrown14 View Post
    Good advice so far, here's my two cents (or pence...I'm a Yank )

    Leave an itinerary with someone you trust. Give that person either a map with your route hilited, or a written description of your intended route and establish a contact time when you will contact that person to let them know you made it out alive. Use the information Sapper gave you and give it to your friend so they'll have it on hand to know exactly what to do in case you don't contact them at the agreed upon time.

    The most important part of this plan is: DON'T DEVIATE FROM YOUR ROUTE.

    This is something I implement every time I go out whether it's a solo day-hike or a multi-day hike with friends. I give my wife a map with the route hilited as well as a written description of the hike, I write the emergency dispatch number for the New York State DEC on the map, and I usually give myself several hours added on to the time I really think I'll get back.

    My best piece of advice is, have fun, and don't take your self too seriously. There's a lot to see and do out there, enjoy it.

    Best of luck!

    Josh

    To be honest I dont plan on hiking that far as this time will just be a small taster I think. Ill probably look at camping in a specific forest/wood and see if there is any decent trails/poi near by or vice versa.

    Maybe once I'm more confident/experienced/exercised ill probably go for longer/further hikes.




    Thanks for the recommendations guys, much appreciated

  10. #10
    Trapper Reaps72's Avatar
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    Just remember that when in the hills your supposed to camp above 600m where possible, otherwise go off the beaten track a ways & no ground fires on peat moorland!

    This is a handy website :
    http://www.backpacking-lite.co.uk/index.htm

    as is this:
    http://v-g.me.uk/index.htm

    When walking with a hefty pack I'd plan on it taking you longer to walk than you think! I use Naismiths rule(roughly 3miles an hour) + 1/3 -1/2 as much time again depending on your fitness! I just took my kids up Kinder Scout & they literally managed 1mile an hour with their packs on!

    Lastly a mosi net for ya head!

    Happy Backpacking!
    If it can't be carried it aint needed

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