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Thread: Swedish Fire Torch

  1. #11
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    A small log candle (or whatever other name it is known by) that I did the other week out of some larch.

    Traditionally were made in conifer plantations I believe.
    1 for cooking on. 2 heat. 3 light. 4 prevention of deep litter/root fires on the forest floor.

    Great use of conifer/pine logs.

    Apologies for the sideways photo.

  2. #12
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    I've heard them called Finnish Candles, Swedish Stoves, and Swedish Fire Logs. They are also excellent in deep snow .
    I tried this out 2 winters ago using an Eastern Red Cedar (a Juniper) split into quarters and lashed together at the bottom with bittersweet vine - worked very nicely and the fire lasted a long while .
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
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  3. #13
    OakashandThorn, like the idea of binding the bottom up with vine once split. I have always done mine with a chainsaw. Will have a go at the split and tie method at some point.
    Not tried cooking on one yet. Will have to try that too. Bbq style with some hot smokeing with juniper foliage maybe.

  4. #14
    Ranger OakAshandThorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by knutjob View Post
    OakashandThorn, like the idea of binding the bottom up with vine once split. I have always done mine with a chainsaw. Will have a go at the split and tie method at some point.
    Not tried cooking on one yet. Will have to try that too. Bbq style with some hot smokeing with juniper foliage maybe.
    You can also just stick the splits into the snow (or ground if it's soft enough), but the vines keep everything together nicely. They are a joy to cook on, very little tending needed.
    My blog, New England Bushcraft

    "Give me six hours to chop down a tree, and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
    ~ Abraham Lincoln

    "Be prepared, not scared."
    ~ Cody Lundin

  5. #15
    Wanderer TarHeelBrit's Avatar
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    Our local grocery store has them for $9.99 handy if you're lazy but want a fire outside in the pit.

  6. #16
    One with Nature
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    hello,
    We've been practicing this method in recent times & as part of Winter Survival fire lighting Received a huge bag of tinder recently from our local Butchers/Fruit & Veg stall (family business) gave me a bag of fine shredded wood, looks more like harsh straw but finer, bundled holds together like a birds nest in handfuls, & tinder dry. So that was stuffed between the split logs we took along for the demo, one strike from the fero rod instant ignition followed by tending to the fire with small pieces of dry twigs accumulated on a firewood scavenge, then stored under a tarp for use during the night. Slept over night in our new borrowed US Mil squad tent. When I say borrowed with intent to return later
    Regards
    David

  7. #17
    Alone in the Wilderness
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    Oh, Its an innovative design done for fire torch.
    Affordable brochure design Agency

  8. #18
    Natural Born Bushcrafter Woody's Avatar
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    Cool stuff

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