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Thread: Trying to make sence of courses and qualifications

  1. #11
    Tribal Elder Fletching's Avatar
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    Experience is definitely the key but I would add that you can get a few very, very useful steps on the ladder by getting some professional training in first aid, navigation and basic meteorology.

    As for fire, foraging, hunting etc., speak directly to the people who do these things at meet-ups and at sites like NB. That's what we're all doing here - asking for and giving advice, sharing ideas etc.

    Steve
    Loud words. Spoken softly. Leave no Trace!

  2. #12
    Tribal Elder AdrianRose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fletching View Post
    Experience is definitely the key but I would add that you can get a few very, very useful steps on the ladder by getting some professional training in first aid, navigation and basic meteorology.

    As for fire, foraging, hunting etc., speak directly to the people who do these things at meet-ups and at sites like NB. That's what we're all doing here - asking for and giving advice, sharing ideas etc.

    Steve
    My point exactly Steve. I have never been on a paid for/organised course in my life but I am more than capable of lighting a fire without any hassle, I can identify approx 2500 different fungi/edible wild plants/medicinal plants, i know every tree in Britain, I know a dozen different knots, I can trap and skin a rabbit and even carve a spoon!

    And all I this has been learnt through either studying the subject matter or talking to cleverer folk than me who I have met along the path and on excellent "free to share" forums like this one.

    Don't mean to sound big headed but the point I'm trying to make is that there is a lot of knowledge, especially on forums like this one that can/should be shared freely at meet-ups, weekenders and gatherings etc.

    Also, as far as I am aware from a few articles that I have read, there is no government recognised qualification specifically on Bushcraft. There are a number of "organisational" ones such as the scouts, DoE, numerous private companies etc. but these are not "official" qualifications as such.

    Again, I agree with Steve, Health and safety, first aid qualifications are a great starting point.

    Ade.
    Last edited by AdrianRose; 02-02-2012 at 08:55 AM.

  3. #13
    Woodsman GwersyllaCnau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Casey View Post
    Hi Ade I dont think you can upset anyone with what you say as I think 99% of us think the same I think though something like the DofE what can be done in schools or cadets tho is a good way of getting some basics (Depending of course on how far you go in it). It is also recognised towards the school qualifications that the kids do now a days. It isnt a big company ripping people off and I learnt a lot back in the 70's from it
    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianRose View Post
    I'm probably gonna rock the boat here but I'm afraid that I just don't believe in paid for courses.

    All of the courses that I've seen advertised and know folk that have been on over the years seem to be a waste of money in my opinion. They tend to concentrate on the trinity of bushcraft - 1. How to start a fire. 2. How to build a shelter. 3. How to cook your food.

    I'll be honest, all of the above are something that is better learnt through practice and learning for free off your fellow bushcrafters at meet ups and communal camps etc.

    I know a certain company who are advertising a "Diploma in Bushcraft", but let's be fair, it doesn't mean bugger all. A Diploma in Bushcraft is a "non-qualification", it isn't recognised as a qualification and is nothing more than a certificate knocked up on a pc.

    My advice, for what it's worth, stick to practicing and meeting like minded people who have some knowledge in each topic and share/learn for free.

    Sorry if I have offended any instructors/teachers/bushcraft company owners etc.

    Ade.
    I agree with both these quotes though I did the DofE in early '80's (sorry Ben lol).

  4. #14
    Wanderer
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    You can spend £200 on a weekend course, at any number of Bushcraft Schools, and learn a bit about the trinity of Bushcraft, (fire shelter food) or hang about the (this) forums, for a month or so, and go to a local to you meet, and learn just as much if not more from people who (for the most part) will share and show, and help you for pretty much free. I cannot tell you just how helpful most 'crafters are, when it comes to explaining and showing people how to do something, not just once but dozens of time until you can do it yourself. Once you know the basics you can practice in your garden, on the beach, even in a layby (if you don't have a garden). Once you've got the basics down, you can think about more worthwhile courses, and training.
    you can't become a rally driver, until you know how to drive.... or can you?

  5. #15
    Native Shewie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ben Casey View Post
    Cool but who gives the guys that instruct the initial qualification to be instructors?
    No qualification just experience, it's the weekend warriors with no experience that decide to setup a bushy school that worry me. If the instructors have genuine experience and not just sat on a course for 12 months then I'm all for it, not just some fantasy they play at during the weekend. As an example the tracking course was run by a guy who's been on the SAS selection team for 20+ years, was one of RM's original instructors at Woodlore, is currently working with Mr Grylls and various other TV productions and has instructed in every type of terrain on the planet, you don't get the chance to learn from somebody like that very often.

    I don't really do meets, I'd rather be out exploring new places with a couple of pals. As for bushcraft qualifications, I don't agree with that either, what I do respect though is somebody's experience in the field and the fact that they are willing to pass that knowledge on.

    Experience, experience, experience

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shewie View Post
    Experience, experience, experience
    Nail + Hammer = head total agreement

    Bit like the First Aid instructor who has done the course but never done first aid (they exist!) versus the Paramedic/EMT ex Mil medic et al who teaches First Aid....

    AHEM........By the way if anyone wants any First Aid training specific to an outdoor/mountain environment....
    [

  7. #17
    Natural Born Bushcrafter luresalive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shewie View Post
    No qualification just experience, it's the weekend warriors with no experience that decide to setup a bushy school that worry me. If the instructors have genuine experience and not just sat on a course for 12 months then I'm all for it, not just some fantasy they play at during the weekend. As an example the tracking course was run by a guy who's been on the SAS selection team for 20+ years, was one of RM's original instructors at Woodlore, is currently working with Mr Grylls and various other TV productions and has instructed in every type of terrain on the planet, you don't get the chance to learn from somebody like that very often.

    I don't really do meets, I'd rather be out exploring new places with a couple of pals. As for bushcraft qualifications, I don't agree with that either, what I do respect though is somebody's experience in the field and the fact that they are willing to pass that knowledge on.

    Experience, experience, experience
    I agree completely, but you'd be surprised by how many "schools" are set up by just such people who market themselves as the best or "foremost", yet have done virtually nothing that could give them their basis as an instructor, neither have they travelled, or practised in different environments but mearly done a bushcraft course once and therefore now think they know it all! (and they charge exhorbitant prices too!!!!!)

  8. #18
    Ranger Ben Casey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GwersyllaCnau View Post
    I agree with both these quotes though I did the DofE in early '80's (sorry Ben lol).
    I feel old now LOL Mind you I joined the Army when we had 2439 at the start of our number so there has to be someone on here with a lower number than me
    CLAP clearly loudly, as an order, with pauses

  9. #19
    Ranger Ben Casey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shewie View Post
    No qualification just experience, it's the weekend warriors with no experience that decide to setup a bushy school that worry me. If the instructors have genuine experience and not just sat on a course for 12 months then I'm all for it, not just some fantasy they play at during the weekend. As an example the tracking course was run by a guy who's been on the SAS selection team for 20+ years, was one of RM's original instructors at Woodlore, is currently working with Mr Grylls and various other TV productions and has instructed in every type of terrain on the planet, you don't get the chance to learn from somebody like that very often.
    I don't really do meets, I'd rather be out exploring new places with a couple of pals. As for bushcraft qualifications, I don't agree with that either, what I do respect though is somebody's experience in the field and the fact that they are willing to pass that knowledge on.
    Experience, experience, experience
    I agree with you mate I would not argue with anyone who has done time with the SAS or RM as in my head they have some of the best ways in the world I drove the boss of the SAS once (General Sir Peter Edgar de la Cour de la Billière) and nearly pooped my pants when he was in the rover with me. First time I have stuttered in my whole life
    But as stated by others there are people out there who havent got a clue and not all military service means you can teach bushcraft I served 17 years in there and I still have a lot to learn about bushcraft
    CLAP clearly loudly, as an order, with pauses

  10. #20
    Native Realearner's Avatar
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    So i have to agree with all the sentiments here. I have not been in the military and the only courses I have done have been for flint knapping, with the Lords so lots of experience there, and one other as a present which i enjoyed but wont mention here. But both were one day jobs and in the woods so great.
    But to return to the subject I have learnt so much useful stuff from this site alone that if I had paid for that it would have cost a fair bit of hard earned cash. And from this site I have surfed you tube and other sites and the knowledge is out there. But meeting and talking with others is also a great way to learn and have fun, at no major cost.
    Well I think I have covered all I wanted to say, apart from whatever you do enjoy it

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