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Thread: Hexamine tablets wont burn

  1. #21
    Natural Born Bushcrafter Woody's Avatar
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    Damn , that's a head scratcher , but at least you didn't find out in the field ...

    I've just recently converted to bio éthanol ... So easy compared to the whole hobo stove thing with the endless stick feeding thing....

    I'll keep he hobo for fun , but the trangia and penny stoves for the morning brews !!
    Easy peasy 👍👍

  2. #22
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody View Post
    Damn , that's a head scratcher , but at least you didn't find out in the field ...

    I've just recently converted to bio éthanol ... So easy compared to the whole hobo stove thing with the endless stick feeding thing....

    I'll keep he hobo for fun , but the trangia and penny stoves for the morning brews !!
    Easy peasy ����
    Yeah the endless feeding is what irritates me, and to do that on my wood gas stove I have to lift the kettle off first as well...
    A trangia you fill once, nd it burns untill the water boils...
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
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  3. #23
    Woodsman bopdude's Avatar
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    Interesting points re wood gas stove, and I fully sympathise, I gave mine away after using it once, I recently saw a great video that has got me buying another, instead of small twigs etc you set it up as a holder for a smallish Swedish candle, I'll see if I can find the video again but it looked like the mutts

  4. #24
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    I had a nice summer with mine...but had to suffer endelss ridicule from my wife, who do not give two whistles about bushcraft.
    She is a Thai farm girl, from way out in the sticks in rural Thailand, and had a fire built and food cooked before I could bring my brew to boil...and
    it felt supid to faff about with that thing right next to her cooking fire, lol


    So I am back to camp fires mostly. They have lifted the general country wide fire ban from april to october in Norway, making things easier for those willing to risk it.
    Instead they hang you up in the town square and flog you with stinging nettels if you are stupid enough to start a brush fire.
    But Ill stick a trangia stove in the go bag with the kettle, for when I am allone and just want a warm drink :-)
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  5. #25
    Natural Born Bushcrafter Woody's Avatar
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    Hahahah😂😂😂
    your description of the wives fire and cooking skills really sums up the whole bushcraft thing...

    Sometimes less is more !
    I feel your pain ...

    As they say over here , "all the gear, no idea" ...
    I got way too much gear , and only a tiny bit of the idea....😂

    Though i must admit I'm a convert to the alcohol stove thing...
    Great bit of kit , clean burn, no stick feed no fuss .
    Perfect for that morning brew ...
    I won't part with that one...😊
    👍

  6. #26
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Yeah there are certain things we all "got to" have. It becomes a bit of a kit hysteria for some. Well, me included for a while.
    I got into it because I wanted a nicer knife for outdoor activities than a Mora, but it was quite low budget so I started to search the internet.
    Came across one of the NB youtube videos, stumbled in here. Before that I had never heard the word bushcraft...

    I ended up having my own youtube channel, and as I had very little kit I had to kit up anyway. So havinng found the knife, the next was a stove (I ended up with a whole collection),
    sleeping bag and hammock system (only have 3 hammocks before I came to my senses), clothes, more knives, fire steels it became a little crazy. Then my money ran out as I went back to school, but still manage to purchase the odd bit, that I do not really need.

    All you need really is a pair of comfortable shoes, a Thermos bottle for a hot drink is nice, and mora to make some spits for your hot dogs...
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  7. #27
    Samuel Hearne
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    I was issued with a 58 pattern plastic mug that fitted on top of the issued 58 pattern water bottle then I got myself a stainless steel mug (crusader) before they were issued and it onto the bottom of the water bottle, it all fits into the issued water bottle pouch, I still have them and the Crusader has been used more times than I can remember, brewing, cooking or for heating water for washing shaving in, the plastic mug is what you put you brew in (no more burnt lips)

  8. #28
    Tribal Elder Humakt's Avatar
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    Right, the burnt lips thing with a metal mug.
    A bit of science - when two objects of different temperatures come together then the laws of conduction mean that the hotter object will transfer its energy to the cooler object.
    In real terms, that means that the mug can not be hotter than the liquid. Or the liquid hotter than the mug.
    Therefore, if you can't put your lips to the mug treat that as a thermometer, because it means the liquid contents are just as hot and will burn you! So let it cool!

    In reality I have found that the rim of the mug (where you put your lips) is often much cooler than the liquid because it is not in contact with the liquid and wind chill often cools it down.

    So in either case insulating the rim is unnecessary.

    I've always used a metal mug for heating/drinking and I've NEVER needed to insulate the rim. If it's too hot for my lips then the contents are too hot for my mouth!
    'What is this life if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare' - William Henry Davies

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  9. #29
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Yeah but what if the cup was used to boil the water, then teh surface temp of the outsiude of the cup, could be a lot higher than the surface on the inside that gets cooled by the liquid...
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  10. #30
    Tribal Elder Humakt's Avatar
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    That's how I do it - I drink from the mug I use to boil the water.
    And I've never burnt my lips.

    The bottom of the mug, which is in contact with the flame, will be hotter. The rim, though, which is not in contact with the flame, won't be. In fact, the rim can never be hotter than the contents. Simple, pure, science tells you that. If you put your lips to the rim, and it burns, then you would be well advised NOT to swallow the contents because they will be just as hot (possibly even hotter). Therefore, using insulation on the rim is actually very dangerous because you will not be able to get a good idea of the true temperature of the contents.
    The fact is that the rim is often cooler than the mug's contents because the rim is not in direct contact with the contents and will often be cooled by wind and ambient temperature (which it IS in contact with).
    That's the science behind it. And I know this to be true because I have experienced it myself. When I go to drink from my mug (which I have also used to heat the contents) then if the rim is too hot for my lips then I know the contents will be even hotter and dangerous to swallow. And letting it stand for a few minutes will mean the rim cools faster (since it is not in contact with the hot contents but is in contact with the cool air) than the hot liquid is; though I can now put my lips to the mug, I still have to sip tentatively in case the liquid is still hot.

    Try it. Boil a mug of water, let it stand for a couple of minutes. Then touch the rim. You will notice it has cooled considerably quicker than the body of the mug which is in contact with the hot liquid.

    Insulating the rim is not only unnecessary it is actually dangerous.
    'What is this life if, full of care, we have no time to stand and stare' - William Henry Davies

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