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Thread: Mt sharps, a short review and why I love them

  1. #1
    Mountainous Approved FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Mt sharps, a short review and why I love them

    These are all the family sharps, except the big lads, and I did not want to violate their privacy and maybe accidentally find whatever they hide in there that I do not want to know about, as they are at school right now.

    We are actually using all of these to some degree. Somme not in a way I would wish, but we are a family, and so long as they stay away from MY knives, they are free to
    buthcer the oters...as long as I get to have the fun of restoring them, once the destruction has died down...

    Anyway, first picture is the entire collection of things that may go horribly wrong in our little clan.




    Okay, lets look at the indiduals, and we start with the Moras I think.

    On the left with the green handle is the Mora 2000. This is my fishing knife, as it is in stainless steel. I try to keep it sharp, but the wife and kids sometimes steals it and it often ends up sheath-less in a kitchen drawer or in the knife block. So it has become more like the family utility knife. Thin, 2 mm blade and slightly longer than the standard Mora, it is a usefull camp knife.

    Next with a gray handle is the Mora Robust. Kind of rough knife, but very sharp. Carbon steel makes it easy to maintain, as I found out as the kids got their fingers on it before I could even use it, and cut something that makes knives rust with it, and put back in the sheath without cleaning it. The sheath that comes with it is a joke, so keep it in an old Mora 711 sheath that retains it much better. Have not used it myself yet, but as sharp as any Mora, but with a thicker blade at 3mm than I like for wood work.

    Third and fourth from the left is my Mora 711 knives. The rusty top one is the one I use, the clean chipped one is the one the wife uses to carve stone with or something. Always comes back destroyed. Carbon steel, and a lovely wood working knife, 2mm blade thickness, and the most comfortable handle in the world. Your hand wont get tired on this one.

    Next to the Mora 711 is the Mora 946, which is the stainless steel version of the 711. This is the wifes fishing and everything knife.

    Then the two wood handled knives are the Mora 106 (long blade) and the Mora 120 (short blade). These are whitling knives, and very good at it. I wish the Mora 120 had a thinner blade though. I have not used these a lot. The Mora 106 I found in my grandfathers shed after he died. Anyway certainly worth having, but I use the Mora 711 more, due to the comfortable handle.




    The next three. What to say about them

    The top one is my Enzo Trapper. I built it myself from a kit. And this is my belt knife. Used primarily for slicing open packs of hot dogs, and for sharpening when I feel like sharpening something, hence it is kept scary sharp. Else the handle is to narrow to be comfortable as a whitling/ wood working knife, and the blade at 3mm is too thick. But probably a very good hunting knife that comes ina variaty of steel grades. Mine is O2 tool steel. wont recomend it for bushcraft. But since I "made" this I still carry it.

    In the middle is my embarrasment. It's a fake Bear Grylls knife, bought on Ebay. This was before I got into bushcraft, and I just "needed" something that was not a Mora, found this cheap on Ebay and ordered it...at the time I did not know who Beer Grills was, but as a result of looking for this knife I found the NBC videos on Youtube, and got interested in Bushcraft. The knife itself?
    Hollow grind, AUS8 steel, lovely knife to use, and it is know my fishing knife. Very good for gutting fish :-)

    Bellow that is my kids Mora Scout knife. Dealy sharp, and fit right in the hand of a 6 year old. He loves it, and carries it proudly in his belt when we are out :-)



    The next are the Leukus.

    The longer one is the real deal from Knivsmed Strømeng, in carbon steel. 9 inch blade and can be used for everything. What I use it for is cutting fire wood mostly. Much more effective and less tiresome to use than those little garden pruning saws. I carry it on my back pack. And I love it. Not heavy at all for such a long knife as the blade is only 3mm thick. Next to it is my wives fake, cheap, monster leuku, that she uses to chop bone, chicken and everything elese that comes in her way with. It's the least sharp knife in the histury of humankind, and the steel is an embarrasment.



    The next are my folding knives. Mostly only used in the house for opening boxes.

    But from the left:

    Opinel #8 in stainless steel. Cheap french lockable folder. Comes very sharp, but I cant get used to the thin, flexible blade and always cut deeper than I intend. Lives with my traditional flint and steel kit instead of the Opinel # Carbon steel next to it that rusted in the leather puch I keep all my low tech pyrotechnics in. Good striker for a fire steel to.

    Next is my small Victorinox SAK. Lives in my pocket when I can remeber to put it there. Used for opening stuff, triom my nails and to keep my fingers busy when bored. And then my second SAK, the Wenger Ranger SAK with that little useless saw. Much faster to just use the blade to cut whatever is thin enough to use the saw on. Hate the blade, should have gone for the straight edge instead of that useless serrated tacticool one. SOmetimes live on my belt when out on familly type afairs on the woods with other families present, as sadly also Northern Norwegian are turning into hysterical fairies that get scared when see a knife. I blame the millenials, and their "perfect" life styles.



    Saws then.

    This type of saw, here represented by a Fiskars/Gerber saw and a cheap nameless one, are both useless. Much faster to eitehr use a hatchet or a big knife like a Leuku or a machete. It's just to tiresome to use these for me. I know others love this type of saw.



    This is a real saw. One of the best full sized bow saws there is. And in Norway, the cheapest :-)
    A must for winter camping if you want a camp fire burning all night here in the arctic winter, this is what you need. No puny little garden saws.



    And the saws combined with a real axe. Like this full sized Hultafors Felling axe. The mask was made by a dear friend here on the forum, who passed away a couple of years ago. Tony1948, may you always be rememembered!

    Have used this axe and it is superb for limbing trees, and mostly in winter I look for a fallen birch that the moose has been on, stripping the bark, that way the wood is dry and not rotten. One full sized tree gives enough fire wood for one evening, and that is only the limbs, and this axe make it easy to chop them off.

    The next axe is my little Wetterlings hatchet. Not sure exactly what model. My wife loves this one, as it is small and light. And she actually tries to keep it in good condition...only two three knicks so far!

    In the same picture is my Victorinox super tool. Use the pliers a lot, but the blade on it us a useless serrated edge affair. Bought it for going to Africa as I could not find my leatherman tool, and this is what they had at the airport. Got scissors also and the usual SAK stuff.

    Last edited by FishyFolk; 13-02-2017 at 02:28 PM.
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  2. #2
    Samuel Hearne
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    Good to see someone has got a few sharps just like myself.

  3. #3
    Moderator jus_young's Avatar
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    I get comments over how many sharps I own and it is nowhere near as many as you.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Mountainous Approved FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Ther is still a couple of knives left. My grandfathers belt knife, which I keep on display with some other memories, and that crappy Øyo viking axe...and of course the... *drum roll*

    The authentic original Rambo knife as seen in the movie. Only £3.99, must not be mistaken for cheap copies!...wel I was 12. lol
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

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