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Thread: Beginners kit list - correction request

  1. #1
    Hobo
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    Beginners kit list - correction request

    (Not sure if its the right category. Also, Ive posted exact same topic on a different forum, hope its not considered as spam. If any of these - sorry)

    Hello everyone. Im gathering my kit from scratch. Here are the goals:
    - Terrain: Northern Poland (seashore, forests, lots of flat terrain, very few hills and wet areas)
    - Season: Late spring , summer, early autumn
    - Trip duration: 24-72 hours
    - Other: I tried to go very minimalistic and simple by, for example, discarding any electronics (apart my phone which i do not consider a kit part)

    1. Essentials (held on sturdy leather belt, around my neck or wrist, on me generally)

    - Knife (4 inch scandi laminated Helle blade with wooden handle made by me + leather sheath)
    - Firestriker (Solo Scientific Aurora worn as pendant)
    - Whistle (Helikon, but planning to change as its not really loud enough. Also carried on neck)
    - Canteen (Not sure yet, something around 1 liter capacity and made of stainless steel probably)
    - Compass (I'd like a simple vintage one, but they are all for display now, so probably some Silva)
    - Paracord wristband (Not a fan of "tactical gadgets" but it might be lifesaver if i lose my backpack or something like that)
    - Notebook + pencil (Rite in the rain, to write memos about gear along the way. Repair this, change that and so on)
    - First Aid Kit (Not sure if i will carry that on me or in backpack. It will contain antiseptic, tape, bandages and compresses, some bandaids, small tongs for ticks, stomach ache pills and painkillers)
    - Survival Tin (It will contain stuff for emergency situations which will likely never occur, but better to be prepared. Fishing kit, matches, water purification tablets, signal mirror - generally survival stuff)
    - Tinderbox (camera film box stuffed with some good pre-made tinder. Might be consider cheating, but i might not be able to find good dry tinder and be in great need for quick fire one day, so I will carry it)
    - Clothes: For now I will be using just normal "civilian" clothes, some cheap hiking shoes - I can't afford quality wool clothing and with good layering I'll go along with cotton garments.
    + might add a Rambone slingshot to the survival tin one day, but thats just an idea for now

    2. Backpack - Karrimor Sabre 45. One day I will upgrade to Osprey Aether 70 for longer hikes.
    - Sleeping system (DD Tarp, simple foam mat and Snugpak Navigator sleeping bag. No hammock needed)
    - Additional clothing set
    - Axe (Hultafors Hunting Axe)
    - Lunchbox (Zebra 14)
    - Paracord (30 meters)
    - Sewing kit (BCB probably)
    - Sharpening stone (EZE one with wooden plate at the bottom)
    - Storm lantern (Feuerhand)
    - Personal stuff - Phone, toothbrush, natural soap
    - Food and water of course

    That would be all I think. Im not really asking for opinions, because kit is very personal, depending on what You do, how You work and stuff like that, so my kit won't probably suit anyone else. Im just asking more experienced guys to check "kit goals" and point out some stuff that I will definitely need, yet didn't mention. Or something to throw away. However, opinions are also of course very welcome. Thank You.

    P.S. The other forum guys already told me that storm lantern is a very bad idea for backpacking and that I should go with a torch, which I really wanted to avoid. What do You guys think? I won't be marching anywhere at night without need, the lamp is supposed to be there for night camping works or reading. Will really everything get stinky eventually, even if I transport the lantern with empty tank and keep the fuel sealed tight?

  2. #2
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    You and many other will or may disagree with me on this, but to be blunt...some of what you carry is not really necessary. It's just gadgets that while fun to make, and fun to bring, just ads weight as you will never use them. And if you ever really needed them, it's time to call rescue services, or simply go home. :-)


    Quote Originally Posted by Lonewolf44 View Post
    (Not sure if its the right category. Also, Ive posted exact same topic on a different forum, hope its not considered as spam. If any of these - sorry)

    Hello everyone. Im gathering my kit from scratch. Here are the goals:
    - Terrain: Northern Poland (seashore, forests, lots of flat terrain, very few hills and wet areas)
    - Season: Late spring , summer, early autumn
    - Trip duration: 24-72 hours
    - Other: I tried to go very minimalistic and simple by, for example, discarding any electronics (apart my phone which i do not consider a kit part)

    1. Essentials (held on sturdy leather belt, around my neck or wrist, on me generally)

    - Knife (4 inch scandi laminated Helle blade with wooden handle made by me + leather sheath)
    Will be perfectly fine :-)

    - Firestriker (Solo Scientific Aurora worn as pendant) - Agreed
    - Whistle (Helikon, but planning to change as its not really loud enough. Also carried on neck) Ok.
    - Canteen (Not sure yet, something around 1 liter capacity and made of stainless steel probably) OK
    - Compass (I'd like a simple vintage one, but they are all for display now, so probably some Silva): Silva compasses works :-)
    - Paracord wristband (Not a fan of "tactical gadgets" but it might be lifesaver if i lose my backpack or something like that): Keep it dry. Paracaord soaks up water like crazy and gets heavy.
    - Notebook + pencil (Rite in the rain, to write memos about gear along the way. Repair this, change that and so on): OK
    - First Aid Kit (Not sure if i will carry that on me or in backpack. It will contain antiseptic, tape, bandages and compresses, some bandaids, small tongs for ticks, stomach ache pills and painkillers): If you are going to be alone, using an axe, bring something to suture yourself, or some surgical strips, to close bigger or deeper wounds.
    - Survival Tin (It will contain stuff for emergency situations which will likely never occur, but better to be prepared. Fishing kit, matches, water purification tablets, signal mirror - generally survival stuff): Fun to make and have but completely useless in my oppinion.
    - Tinderbox (camera film box stuffed with some good pre-made tinder. Might be consider cheating, but i might not be able to find good dry tinder and be in great need for quick fire one day, so I will carry it): OK...bring a water proof bag/zip lock or whatver to collect some birch bark on your way.
    - Clothes: For now I will be using just normal "civilian" clothes, some cheap hiking shoes - I can't afford quality wool clothing and with good layering I'll go along with cotton garments.: Charity shops, army surplus? I hope you will manage to stay dry.
    + might add a Rambone slingshot to the survival tin one day, but thats just an idea for now: fun to have, and lets face it...when the oooh and aaah...have faded over the view (takes me 5 minutes), it's pretty boring out there, so nice to have something to do. All for it.

    2. Backpack - Karrimor Sabre 45. One day I will upgrade to Osprey Aether 70 for longer hikes.:OK
    - Sleeping system (DD Tarp, simple foam mat and Snugpak Navigator sleeping bag. No hammock needed): OK
    - Additional clothing set : OK
    - Axe (Hultafors Hunting Axe): Nice
    - Lunchbox (Zebra 14): OK
    - Paracord (30 meters): Keep it dry, it soaks water like a spunge and gets heavy.
    - Sewing kit (BCB probably): OK
    - Sharpening stone (EZE one with wooden plate at the bottom): Do you really need it for sucha short time out?
    - Storm lantern (Feuerhand): Cozy but I'd just use some candles for that purpose. if windy just cupt open the side of a soda/ beer can, and stick the cvandle inside.
    - Personal stuff - Phone, toothbrush, natural soap: OK
    - Food and water of course: Wise :-)

    That would be all I think. Im not really asking for opinions, because kit is very personal, depending on what You do, how You work and stuff like that, so my kit won't probably suit anyone else. Im just asking more experienced guys to check "kit goals" and point out some stuff that I will definitely need, yet didn't mention. Or something to throw away. However, opinions are also of course very welcome. Thank You.

    P.S. The other forum guys already told me that storm lantern is a very bad idea for backpacking and that I should go with a torch, which I really wanted to avoid. What do You guys think? I won't be marching anywhere at night without need, the lamp is supposed to be there for night camping works or reading. Will really everything get stinky eventually, even if I transport the lantern with empty tank and keep the fuel sealed tight?
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  3. #3
    Hobo
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    Thanks a lot for checking it all with details. To be honest I made up my mind about what You said and I think You're right - Poland is not Patagonia, even with the worst case scenario like losing backpack in the mountains or falling into unsecured well, my phone and whistle will be completely enough. In 90% of Europe, its not like I would have to wait a week for rescue, hunt to not starve and so on. So I'm dropping the "in case of disaster" items from my list, paracord bracelet included. However I think I will leave water purification tablets. On longer hikes I'm planning to take like 70% of needed water and supply the rest by filtering and boiling. Doing that requires good planning ahead, and Im not experienced enough. Probably sometimes I will predict stuff wrong and won't be able to build a filter and campfire, so Ill just keep those tablets in first aid kit. What do You think?

    Sharpening stone - I was discussing it with some people and I think i might drop that too. I treat all the tools with much care. How long would You need to stay out there to take a sharpening stone? 1 week +?

    Paracord - You mentioned it soaks up a lot twice - do You use some other line type for shelter making and repairs? Its not like I need paracord and thats it, I just thought nowadays pretty much everyone uses it and nothing else.

    Storm lantern - Maybe I played The Long Dark too much But I really wanted to avoid bringing a flashlight (in emergency I have my phone flashlight). I need a source of light just for camp works after dusk, some reading, I won't be marching anywhere at night, and even if so I would definitely not use any light. Will candles be enough? Cause they would save up a lot of space compared to lantern.

    Clothes - What would You suggest? Cause buying super-expensive military or fjallraven clothes misses my idea of bushcraft completely, but I don't really know what to wear. In Shooting Association we all had uniforms and in reenactment - wool clothes, so I have no experience at all.

    Also, feel free to give me any suggestions if You would add anything to the kit.

  4. #4
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lonewolf44 View Post
    Thanks a lot for checking it all with details. To be honest I made up my mind about what You said and I think You're right - Poland is not Patagonia, even with the worst case scenario like losing backpack in the mountains or falling into unsecured well, my phone and whistle will be completely enough. In 90% of Europe, its not like I would have to wait a week for rescue, hunt to not starve and so on. So I'm dropping the "in case of disaster" items from my list, paracord bracelet included. However I think I will leave water purification tablets. On longer hikes I'm planning to take like 70% of needed water and supply the rest by filtering and boiling. Doing that requires good planning ahead, and Im not experienced enough. Probably sometimes I will predict stuff wrong and won't be able to build a filter and campfire, so Ill just keep those tablets in first aid kit. What do You think?

    Sharpening stone - I was discussing it with some people and I think i might drop that too. I treat all the tools with much care. How long would You need to stay out there to take a sharpening stone? 1 week +?

    Paracord - You mentioned it soaks up a lot twice - do You use some other line type for shelter making and repairs? Its not like I need paracord and thats it, I just thought nowadays pretty much everyone uses it and nothing else.

    Storm lantern - Maybe I played The Long Dark too much But I really wanted to avoid bringing a flashlight (in emergency I have my phone flashlight). I need a source of light just for camp works after dusk, some reading, I won't be marching anywhere at night, and even if so I would definitely not use any light. Will candles be enough? Cause they would save up a lot of space compared to lantern.

    Clothes - What would You suggest? Cause buying super-expensive military or fjallraven clothes misses my idea of bushcraft completely, but I don't really know what to wear. In Shooting Association we all had uniforms and in reenactment - wool clothes, so I have no experience at all.

    Also, feel free to give me any suggestions if You would add anything to the kit.
    About the paracord, yes I fell for the paracord hype and used it as guylines for my tarp. They are still on there but will definatly replace with something else that does not soak up water some day.
    It's always a yood idea to have some ropage though. So I have couple of lengths of thick hemp string in my fire kit to keep it dry, as it is also a good tinder and strong, not to mention cheap. I can use it for
    tying up everything that needs binding togheter if needed, or to make repairs on my kit.

    For the knife, I do have a very small sharpening stone to field fix a knick in the blade of my knife or axe. It is about 2x6cm in size :-)

    Yeah on the continent and england you need to worry about water, I am just not accustomed to give it much of a thought as finding clean water here is not problkem for me. But for you a water filter and boiling is necesasy. Water purification tablets is sort of a last resort...when you cant treat the water from they suspicios looking mud hole in any other way, and you need water to survive...but lets face it, if the situation is that dire, it's time to call it quits, walk over to that farm house and ask for help :-)
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  5. #5
    Hobo
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    Lets update the list. I wanted to highlight that stuff I chose is best I could find for me through reading reviews and scrolling tons of shops. If You know anything better just let me know, cause 90% of the stuff is still not bought.

    Tools:
    1. Knife (Helle Gaupe)
    2. Axe (Hultafors Classic Hunter)
    3. Slingshot (Rambone 2.0)
    Sleeping system:
    1. Tarp (DD Hammocks Superlight)
    2. Foam mat (Any will do I guess)
    3. Snugpak Navigator - right now I have McKinley Laguna (mummy, +8 to +3 degrees comfort zone). Its very cheap but maybe it will do? Or is there a need for better sleeping bag?
    Hiking gear:
    1. Backpack (Karrmior Sabre 45)
    2. Compass (I have no idea what to look for. I just want it to work and withstand abuse)
    3. Canteen (Also a bit lost here. Plastic is lighter but stainless will provide additional boiling container and will take much more abuse)
    4. Whistle (I will just find something loud, not much to talk about here)
    5. Slingshot ammo
    Camping gear:
    1. Firesteel (Aurora, already bought it and love it)
    2. Lunchbox (Zebra 14, I guess its best of stainless out there)
    3. Sewing kit (BCB looks nice, but it doesn't really matter as long as there are needles there right, anything will work)
    4. Cordage (Probably will start with Paracord, maybe change it later)
    5. Notebook and pencil (Rite in the rain should be more than enough)
    6. Supplies and personal (Food, water, phone, hygiene stuff)
    7. Lightsource (Candles, Lantern, still not sure. We will see)
    First Aid Kit:
    Antiseptic, tongs, tape, bandaids, compressess, bandages, pain and poisoning meds, surgical strips as I can't suture and its not that easy to learn I guess.

    Im dropping clothes for a different topic as its a bigger issue.
    Last edited by Lonewolf44; 28-01-2017 at 06:05 PM.

  6. #6
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lonewolf44 View Post
    Lets update the list. I wanted to highlight that stuff I chose is best I could find for me through reading reviews and scrolling tons of shops. If You know anything better just let me know, cause 90% of the stuff is still not bought.

    Tools:
    1. Knife (Helle Gaupe)
    2. Axe (Hultafors Classic Hunter)
    3. Slingshot (Rambone 2.0)
    Sleeping system:
    1. Tarp (DD Hammocks Superlight)
    2. Foam mat (Any will do I guess)
    3. Snugpak Navigator - right now I have McKinley Laguna (mummy, +8 to +3 degrees comfort zone). Its very cheap but maybe it will do? Or is there a need for better sleeping bag?
    Hiking gear:
    1. Backpack (Karrmior Sabre 45)
    2. Compass (I have no idea what to look for. I just want it to work and withstand abuse)
    3. Canteen (Also a bit lost here. Plastic is lighter but stainless will provide additional boiling container and will take much more abuse)
    4. Whistle (I will just find something loud, not much to talk about here)
    5. Slingshot ammo
    Camping gear:
    1. Firesteel (Aurora, already bought it and love it)
    2. Lunchbox (Zebra 14, I guess its best of stainless out there)
    3. Sewing kit (BCB looks nice, but it doesn't really matter as long as there are needles there right, anything will work)
    4. Cordage (Probably will start with Paracord, maybe change it later)
    5. Notebook and pencil (Rite in the rain should be more than enough)
    6. Supplies and personal (Food, water, phone, hygiene stuff)
    7. Lightsource (Candles, Lantern, still not sure. We will see)
    First Aid Kit:
    Antiseptic, tongs, tape, bandaids, compressess, bandages, pain and poisoning meds, surgical strips as I can't suture and its not that easy to learn I guess.

    Im dropping clothes for a different topic as its a bigger issue.
    Looks okay to me.
    Since your going in the warmer half of the year, that sleeping bag will be fine.
    Clothes may be the big issue. If I was going, and money is an issue (as it is for me), I would do what I did. Well, I live in the arctic so even if what I had started out was not so fancy, it was ok.
    I.e some warm underwear, a wool sweater, but if I have to carry it, like 90% of the time in summer I prefer fleeze as it is lighter. But the big issue is to keep dry in the summer months.
    I could not afford something fancy like gore tex, but someone here on the forum fixed me up with a british army surplus dessert pattern gore tex jacket, that looked brand new when I got it for like 25.
    But lets just face it...if it rains the whole day, you're gonna get wet, so a rain poncho may serve you just as well. Anyway a fleece sweater and a pair of long undies should be enough for extra cold protection in the summer, unless you get into some real mountains. For wind protection allmost any kind of smock/anorak will do. But If I could not have gore-tex I would go for something in cotton jsut becosue it breathes. Cotton is fine for that. It's directly on the body that it should be avoided.
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  7. #7
    Hobo
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    Thanks a lot for sacrificing Your time to help me with all that advice, I will bring You some good beers when We meet in the wilderness So I guess my kit list can be finally closed. Ive spent a lot of time last 2-3 weeks thinking it over 100 times and checking up tons of items in the internet. The stuff that I still didn't decide about, like compass or canteen, will probably work out in the field. I need to see what suits me and what does not. Still open to tips and suggestions if anyone wants to join the convo, but I think We're done here for now.

    Moving on to clothes - I won't invest money in fancy stuff before I do some hikes. I need to know my preferences and all that before I buy it. I will probably start out with:
    - some no-name hiking boots from cheap footwear store like Deichmann
    - 2 pairs of regular socks and some thick woolen socks. I will be able to combine layers to suit the current situation and won't be cold for sure. Maybe I will switch to foot wraps some day when I learn to tie them properly. Some people praise them like deities out here.
    - Long thermoactive underwear? Pants and shirt
    - Some t-shirts as base layer
    - Basic cargo pants
    - Main layer: Flannel shirts! I love them to death and don't care what anyone says - durable, warm and I can freely adjust buttons or sleeves length depending on temperature
    - Additional layer: fleece sweatshirts. If its slightly too cold for just the shirt, I can put this on, and flannel shirt on top if its even colder
    - And for the last layer: something waterproof, and I guess I will go with a poncho. Maybe a raincoat would provide another warm layer in case of really low temperature, but it takes up much more space than a poncho and I don't see how I could be cold apart of winter with all that previous layers.
    - Winter and baseball cap
    - Maybe anorak like You've said

    Of course, thats just a thought, not a sealed tight list, but seems reasonable to me. Helicon has some good and affordable garments. Made of mix of cotton and artificial stuff, or cotton and wool, they will for sure be better to wear than jeans and hoodie. I would probably break my legs from the weight if they would soak up :P
    Last edited by Lonewolf44; 28-01-2017 at 09:03 PM.

  8. #8
    Ent FishyFolk's Avatar
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    And then...since you go fully prepared for whatever bad wetaher mother naure can throw at you...you will be baking under clear skies and a +35*C heatwave... :-)

    Your clothes seems okay to me.

    One thing...mind where you put your boots at night. I kicked mine off outside the tent one night, and woke up in the morning with a missing boot. A fox had made off with it.
    I had to hike down from the hills with one foot in my tent bag, with a piece of my sleeping mat as a the sole, and the whole think gaffa taped to me foot.
    Luckilly I came down to the road next to a pub where I could call a taxi to take me to the nearest town to buy me a new pair of boots. I remeember how everyone in the shoe store luaghed as I told my story, and I was seriously on the giggles when I saw my muddy, wet foot prints on the floor trough the entire shopping mall on the way out...lol
    Last edited by FishyFolk; 28-01-2017 at 10:10 PM.
    Victory awaits the one, that has everything in order - luck we call it
    Defeat is an absolute consequense for the one that have neglected to do the necessary preparations - bad luck we call it
    (Roald Amundsen)

    Bumbling Bushcraft on Youtube
    Nordisk Bushcraft - The Nordic bushcraft blog and forum

  9. #9
    Hobo
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    Considering where You live, are You sure these were not trolls or goblins? I would never think an animal could steal a piece of gear. So with a bit of additional research, I polished the list to full completion. Of course there will be tons of changes after some terrain tests, but for my first spring hikes it came out like that (in order, I would throw away the last thing first and so on):

    Essentials - not going anywhere without these:
    1. Knife (Helle Gaupe)
    2. Firesteel (Solo Scientific Aurora)
    3. Backpack (Karrimor 45 Sabre)
    4. Sleeping bag (McKinley Laguna)
    5. Foam mat (Plain)
    6. Tarp (3x3m, DD Hammocks Superlight)
    7. Paracord (30m)
    8. First aid kit
    9. Lunchbox (Zebra 14)
    10. Compass (Silva Field)
    11. Personal hygiene kit (Toothbrush, paste, soap)
    Secondary - I could manage without, but they will make the trip much easier and/or safer:
    12. Axe (Hultafors Classic Hunter)
    13. Canteen (Wildo Hiker Bottle)
    14. Whistle (Mil-Tec Bobby)
    15. Sewing kit (BCB)
    16. Additional clothing set
    Additional - completely optional, but will be very useful for me personally:
    17. Tinderbox (Light My Fire Tinderdust)
    18. Notebook & pencil (Rite In The Rain)
    19. Duct tape

    + Basic clothes, phone and supplies not listed as a kit part

    Comes up to a total of 19 compact and lightweight items. Im very satisfied with this kit quality to price ratio. There will of course be changes (probably will add headlamp quickly, buy Osprey pack and Snugpak bag etc.) but I've already spent far to much time polishing that list. So enough planning, time to buy that stuff. Thank You very much for all help and advice. I will make another topic about clothing when I'll finish gathering the stuff listed above. Cheers and see You!

  10. #10
    Moderator jus_young's Avatar
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    With regards to the lighting situation, have you considered one of these?

    http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/lighting/TC101.html

    There are quite a few folks on this forum that use them, personally I will hang mine from the end of the tarp ridge line or on a guy line when tenting, and the light they give out is perfectly adequate. Various accessories are also available.


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