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RobD
24-05-2013, 04:54 PM
After using packet food for some time (boil in the bag type) I decided to give the old bacon and beans etc a go. Realised, only when out (:ashamed:) that I hadn't considered how I would clean my pans!

Got me wondering though what ways others use to clean their pans after the fry up etc.

I tend to use meths stoves but would welcome ideas for all types of cooking.

Kit Mac
24-05-2013, 05:03 PM
Well you've got a few options.
Easiest of course is to take a small bottle of washing up liquid (those little sets of travel bottles are good, found in most shops) and half a sponge/scourer thing.
Mixing some ash from your campfire with the fat from your fry up will form a basic soap then scrub with moss or grass.
A more bushy solution would be to find a plant which contains sapponin, a natural soap, and crush in warm water. Horsechestnut leaves are your best bet :)

Humakt
24-05-2013, 05:05 PM
Well now, only earlier today I made a post that may just be the answer you've been looking for.
May I kindly direct you to...
http://www.naturalbushcraft.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?5878-Pot-Scraper

suggy
24-05-2013, 05:16 PM
I only tend to cook fry up stuff in my non-stick Trangia cos everything else is a swine to clean whilst out.

Car camping, nice frying pan from home !

If cooking for a few people over a fire I've previously used non-stick baking trays to fry on as well as a grill to make bacon double cheese burgers that put Burger King to shame !

If you wanna cook / burn bacon in a mess tin, take sum emery paper or wet and dry as well as a scourer, or good old Brillo pads, I used to cut 'em in half before I set off.

PS. Poundland non-stick frying pans. Whilst you can remove the handle and use a trangia style pot grabber, they are rubbish ! used once, soaked and scrubbed three times, still no use !!

:)

suggy
24-05-2013, 05:20 PM
Another trick is to use the fine sand from the bottom of a stream to scrub your pots !

:)

Silverback
24-05-2013, 05:26 PM
Another trick is to use the fine sand from the bottom of a stream to scrub your pots !

:)

Thats what we did in the military..sand shingle, small stones, wire wool, scotchbrite

suggy
24-05-2013, 05:28 PM
For any users of the trangia, I say buy a non-stick fry pan for it.

When you clean it at home, when it comes to re-packing it I put a square of kitchen roll between each part. Stops scratching and you don't need to look for something to wipe the general mess when you out an about.

Kernowek Scouser
24-05-2013, 07:52 PM
As I only tend to do a bushy fry up when SWMBO is with me, I think it is only fair that if I cook, she cleans up afterwards.

Strangely, she does not venture out often :confused2:

FishyFolk
24-05-2013, 08:08 PM
My frying pan is non stick, so I just pour some water in, and heat it up a little over the fire, then use a sponge that I keep in a plastuic bag that has been saturated with dish washing liquid before leaving home.

I use the same fro my solo cook kit. The rest of my stuff I just scoure clean with some sand, snow, grass, moss... whatever is at hand, and rince in water....then use the sponge.

garethw
24-05-2013, 08:10 PM
I take a pack of wetwipes... they are not too heavy, and you can burn them in the fire....
cheers
Gareth

paulthefish2009
24-05-2013, 08:39 PM
I use non stick mess tins for "wet food" for stuff that could stick ie: bacon,steak etc I cook on a stick

rawfish111
24-05-2013, 08:48 PM
Thats what we did in the military..sand shingle, small stones, wire wool, scotchbrite

+1 Scotchbrite is the stuff of legend, still carry at least one or two bits

Silverback
24-05-2013, 08:50 PM
+1 Scotchbrite is the stuff of legend, still carry at least one or two bits

that and full fat coke eh ;)

rawfish111
24-05-2013, 09:08 PM
that and full fat coke eh ;)

What else would there be?

Tigger004
24-05-2013, 09:48 PM
Another tip for any type of sooty fire cooking is to smear washing up liquid on the outside of the pan, comes up clean easily, (make sure none gets inside, soapy bacon is disgusting)
Inside the pan has been covered by others, but I do like fishyfolk's idea of pre-soaking a sponge in a bag, T^

CanadianMike
25-05-2013, 11:52 AM
I take a little bottle of dish soap and a sponge with scrubber. But you can also try this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlg7Rd8sHL0

JonnyP
25-05-2013, 12:27 PM
Season your pans so they will be much better 'non stick'.
The ash from the fire can be used to clean pans if you have nothing else.

biker-bri
26-05-2013, 09:45 AM
My lad used to work for the burger company that begins with M - his manager was ex army who taught him how to clean the super hot grills with coke, after one particularly busy day
even coke struggled to clean the grill so he tried "sprite" and it worked MUCH better.
Cheers Bri.

snowleopard
26-05-2013, 01:39 PM
+1 Scotchbrite is the stuff of legend, still carry at least one or two bits

Also good for cleaning pine resin off you knife!

Joel

Silverback
26-05-2013, 03:41 PM
Also good for cleaning pine resin off you knife!

Joel

better for cleaning the gas parts of automatic weapons

rawfish111
26-05-2013, 10:00 PM
better for cleaning the gas parts of automatic weapons

True statement! I'm sure the stuff was invented by the same people...

ian c
26-05-2013, 10:09 PM
Scotch brite is brilliant stuff its a lot better than having to use the piece of wire mesh or a swan vesta match to clean the SLR gas plug.

rawfish111
26-05-2013, 10:56 PM
Scotch brite is brilliant stuff its a lot better than having to use the piece of wire mesh or a swan vesta match to clean the SLR gas plug.

Aye but a match stick was always a handy conversion tool!

alvino78
27-05-2013, 01:21 PM
heres an idea!!!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiB9kUPRXZ4

ian c
27-05-2013, 09:17 PM
The match stick was a good conversion tool until you were caught using it so other ways were thought up, the REME armourer told us another way that when it was examined it was put down to a dirty rifle.