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View Full Version : Could you survive with basics around your house??



Kieran
22-06-2011, 10:57 AM
Now, would you be able to survive with basic stuff around your home?
Lets say 4 nights with just stuff in your house (nothing "survival" like) so you'd have to use something like a butcher knife instead of a Gerber Perang...
And a tarpaulin from the shed?

Lets say a woodland in Cornwall. And you have four nights...

What would you do?

Metal mug
22-06-2011, 01:41 PM
I'd take the freezer with me and a generator (maybe a frying pan). As well as a lighter, a bottle opener and plenty of newspaper. I'd have plenty of food in the freezer and a few beers too. :D

Marvell
22-06-2011, 11:20 PM
Warm & waterproof clothes, bin bags or plastic decorating sheeting, blankets, kitchen knife, a few tools including a saw, ball of string or garden twine, torch, candles, bog roll, water bottles, cooking pot, mug, spoon, tucker, soap and first aid. Sorted!

footsore
23-06-2011, 05:30 PM
Camp in a "beergarden"

Metal mug
23-06-2011, 05:52 PM
Camp in a "beergarden" All you need to work out is how to get free beer, then you'd be in paradise. :happy-clapping:

footsore
23-06-2011, 05:59 PM
No my friend, getting is the easy part, with all that free beer getting home is the real, ad- ad? venture, HiC !!

JEEP
23-06-2011, 08:14 PM
I believe I would be able to survive for a lot more than four nights, with the stuff I have in my apartment - as long as the water keeps flowing.

feebullet
24-06-2011, 11:57 PM
during the floods in Queensland, Australia there was quite a few of us in this situation. We got flooded in and could easily make do, some got flooded out. Others had to jump ship and take what they could. Bushfires and other associated acts of 'stuff you' from the earth makes this a really valid discussion. The government here, in its wisdom advocates emergency kits and has pamphlets on how to fill them and with what etc. I will dig around and see if I can turn some of them up. A great adventure is to turn off the water and electricity for the weekend and see how you go. That was a real eye opener for my wife and kids, 'home camping' can be tricky, flushing toilets and bathing especially!

footsore
25-06-2011, 07:29 AM
I absolutely agree and do forgive me for making lite of the subject, this is a very real problem for many thousands of people globaly,But i do not tend to trust so called government "Experts" Heres the scenario, you heard the alarm for a iminent nuclear attack, (HM gov advice,) remove as many doors as possible to prop against a wall,to form a shelter, stock with food, water, toiletries, first aid kit, paper and marker pens to lable the dead, then cover entire shelter in soil from the garden(2ton aprox) seal entrance and wait for the bang. There was a clue to the error in this in the title of the leaflet, "What to do if you here the FOUR MINUTE warning" Now i know most of us have a basic common sence and would make advanced provision for such minor hickups (the end of the know world) but everybodys dilemma will be diferent so please think it through rather than wait till the last minute and hope somebody is going rush in and tell you what to do.

schooner
25-06-2011, 09:11 AM
during the floods in Queensland, Australia there was quite a few of us in this situation. We got flooded in and could easily make do, some got flooded out. Others had to jump ship and take what they could. Bushfires and other associated acts of 'stuff you' from the earth makes this a really valid discussion. The government here, in its wisdom advocates emergency kits and has pamphlets on how to fill them and with what etc. I will dig around and see if I can turn some of them up. A great adventure is to turn off the water and electricity for the weekend and see how you go. That was a real eye opener for my wife and kids, 'home camping' can be tricky, flushing toilets and bathing especially!

Interesting post mate. I'm in Sydney and during the Qld floods I asked a number of colleagues how well they would be prepared in a similar situation. The unanimous answer was "I'd be #*#@ed". The playstation generation means that the days of pretty much every house having at least some gear/experience in roughing it are long gone. EVERY person I spoke to had no first aid apart from band-aids and panadol, no means of cooking apart from the oven, micro or barbie, and no torches or candles.

feebullet
26-06-2011, 05:31 AM
Interesting post mate. I'm in Sydney and during the Qld floods I asked a number of colleagues how well they would be prepared in a similar situation. The unanimous answer was "I'd be #*#@ed". Might be a Sydney thing mate, I'll have to start asking around to see if I shall require a tin foil hat for my paranoid preparations.

schooner
26-06-2011, 09:03 AM
They laughed at Noah:)

Edwin
27-06-2011, 01:45 PM
Not only could one survive with what is in the house but I think one would have the means to build a whole new life assuming the car was running and the roads were pretty free. Boat/Kayak and the bits to go with them, tents and gear, cooking stuff, immediate water and food, basic woodland and garden tools such as spade and axe etc, means to hunt and fish and deter aggression. If unable to move then we use all of the above from the house as base as well as signing up for our Soyent Green rations and the local law enforcement brigade. Necessary to hide amongst the plebs until the way to open country is clear.

markal17
29-07-2011, 03:16 PM
we had to use all my stuff from my bug out bag when i move house as had no ele or gas
lucky for us we had an open fire that was great for tea & toast
what a great 3 days that was

Ashley Cawley
01-08-2011, 02:19 PM
... The government here, in its wisdom advocates emergency kits and has pamphlets on how to fill them and with what etc. I will dig around and see if I can turn some of them up...I'd be interested to hear what they suggested if it's not too much hassle for you to get it up here.

markal17
03-08-2011, 07:33 PM
my place has more camping stuff than house old gear not shore if thats a good thing or not
we have tents camp cookers loads of diffrent types of lights glow stick the list could go on and on and on
lol

MikeWilkinson
04-08-2011, 08:48 AM
I think the spirit of this scenario is not living in the house, but what to do if you had to leave in a hurry and were not all kit junkies like us - take the sydney crowd mentioned above and think playstation generation.

I would like to answer with, I could probably survive quite well. I have a full assortment of kitchen knives that would all serve quite nicely in the field, a couple of lighters and matches for quick fire lighting, duvet covers make real quick and easy double layer hammocks, I've several plastic sheets in the garage as well as an old builders Tarp. Duvet it self serves as a top and bottom blanket. Sauce pans and frying pans for cooking with, loads of tinned and dry food.

Could either stuff it all into another duvet cover and tie as a makeshift backpack or use the kids all-terrain buggy as a trailer.

As long as you didn't panic and addressed the basic shelter/warmth/food needs I reckon most people wouldn't need to struggle, just takes a little of that not so common - common sense!! :p

LandRoverMatt
13-08-2011, 06:51 AM
what if our bag of camping gears in the house does that count of around the house else i would camp using a water proof motor bike cover as my selter and my beding to sleep with and just take the cookin stuff from the kitchen and take hand germ killer stuff to start a fire and a lighter

LSKnives
02-04-2012, 07:05 PM
The govewrnment here recomends being prepared for a 72 hour emergency. Although suggestions leave a little to be desired. House camping is tricky, depending. My family and I have gotten snowed in most winters for 4- 7 days. Its easier if the water lines dont freeze. Thats why I started storing water, camp stoves, fuel, the works. The oddest was one time when a contractor came and took the furnace out but didnt come to put the new one in for a month. It was -50C, the coldest 4 weeks of the year. Sure glad I had 6 huge electric radiators and a wood pellet stove. It was still cold though. The water lines froze except for the one bathroom so we had to do our dishes in the bath tub. My daughter was only 3 months old so luckily I could still make formula.

Fun times. Tough to be prepared for everything.

GalaxyRider
10-04-2012, 06:59 PM
4143

That'd be me!

David_JAFO
16-10-2012, 11:16 AM
hello,
I was reading this 'old thread' with interest. In the event of a National Emergency
there would be a build up to such through the media etc.. In the UK BBC,TV, local radio stations etc..
In the event of an Emergency without warning depending on personal circumstance yes I think I
could cope.
I would like to add a link for FEMA USofA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) I've dealt
with over the years in a professional occupational capacity along with other organisations including
sharing knowledge & study of persons known to I State Side 'Preppers'.
The FEMA link contains some very good advise which maybe of interest to NBC.
http://www.ready.gov/
Regards
David

mr.punch
19-10-2012, 09:44 PM
My wife is a squirrel bless her so we have loads of food in and I have knives and guns 2 kelly kettles and a woodgas stove, water is not too much of a problem as the river is only about 15 mins away and I could get me a pigeon or rook on the way if meat got short, or we could just take our fully equipped caravan with solar panels down there.

We would be fine.

fish
20-10-2012, 08:56 PM
ille join you!